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Music Concerts J.S. Bach

Yuja Wang 2020 Recital Chopin, Scriabin, Ravel, Bach, Brahms, Galuppi

Yuja Wang 2020 Recital Chopin, Scriabin, Ravel, Bach, Brahms, Galuppi with sheet music

sheet music pdf

Track listing:

0:00 Galuppi – Sonata No. 5 in C major
4:17 Bach – Toccata in C minor BWV 911
14:20 Chopin – Mazurka in A minor Op. 67 No. 4
16:15 Brahms – Intermezzo in E minor, Op. 119 No. 2
20:04 Chopin – Mazurka in C sharp minor Op. 30 No. 4
23:18 Brahms – Intermezzo in C sharp minor, Op. 117 No. 3
28:36 Chopin – Mazurka in B minor Op. 33 No. 4
32:13 Brahms – Romance in F major Op. 118 No. 5
37:02 Ravel – Une Barque sur L’Ocean from Miroirs
43:48 Scriabin – Piano Sonata No. 4 in F sharp major, Op. 30

Encore : 52:42 Bizet/Horowitz – Variations on a Theme from Carmen

Live on 5 February 2020 Palm Beach, FL
Breakers Palm Beach

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Music Concerts Jazz Music

Louis Armstrong – A Kiss To Build A Dream On 1962 LIVE (1962)

Louis Armstrong A Kiss To Build A Dream On 1962 Live (1962)

Louis Armstrong’s sheet music available in our Library.

Louis Daniel Armstrong, active 1914-1971 (August 4, 1901 — July 6, 1971), nicknamed Satchmo or Pops, was an American jazz trumpeter and singer from New Orleans, Louisiana.

Coming to prominence in the 1920s as an “inventive” cornet and trumpet player, Armstrong was a foundational influence in jazz, shifting the music’s focus from collective improvisation to solo performance.

louis armstrong sheet music pdf

With his instantly recognizable deep and distinctive gravelly voice, Armstrong was also an influential singer, demonstrating great dexterity as an improviser, bending the lyrics and melody of a song for expressive purposes. He was also greatly skilled at scat singing, vocalizing using sounds and syllables instead of actual lyrics.

Renowned for his charismatic stage presence and voice almost as much as for his trumpet-playing, Armstrong’s influence extends well beyond jazz music, and by the end of his career in the 1960s, he was widely regarded as a profound influence on popular music in general.

Armstrong was one of the first truly popular African-American entertainers to “cross-over,” whose skin-color was secondary to his amazing talent in an America that was severely racially divided. It allowed him socially-acceptable access to the upper echelons of American society that were highly restricted for a person of color. While he rarely publicly politicized his race, often to the dismay of fellow African-Americans, he was privately a huge supporter of the Civil Rights movement in America.

A Kiss to Build a Dream On

A Kiss to Build a Dream On” is a song composed by Bert Kalmar, Harry Ruby and Oscar Hammerstein II. In 1935, Kalmar and Ruby wrote a song called “Moonlight on the Meadow” for the Marx Brothers film A Night at the Opera (1935) but the song was not used. Hammerstein later adapted the lyrics to be “A Kiss to Build a Dream On” and it was recorded by Louis Armstrong in 1951.

It was also performed by Armstrong as well as by Mickey Rooney with William Demarest, by Sally Forrest, and by Kay Brown (virtually the entire cast performed part or all of the song) in the 1951 film “The Strip,” and was a sort of recurring theme in the film. The song was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Original Song in 1951 but lost out to “In the Cool, Cool, Cool of the Evening”.

Other recordings

Another popular recording was made by one of “The Strip” film’s guest-stars, Monica Lewis, and in early 1952, the version by Hugo Winterhalter and his Orchestra, with vocalist Johnny Parker, made it to the Pop 20 chart in the United States.

Bing Crosby recorded it for his radio show in 1951 and it was later included in the deluxe, 22-track version of the album Songs I Wish I Had Sung the First Time Around.

Sung by Richard Chamberlain, the song gained considerable exposure due to its being on the ‘B’ side of his 1962 hit: “Theme from Dr. Kildare (Three Stars Will Shine Tonight)“.

k.d. lang‘s version was included in the album A Wonderful World (2002)

Rod Stewart covered the song in his 2004 album, Stardust: the Great American Songbook 3.

Deana Martin recorded A Kiss to Build a Dream On in 2009. The song was released on her album, Volare, in 2009 by Big Fish Records.

Lyrics

Give me a kiss to build a dream on,
And my imagination will thrive upon that kiss.
Sweetheart, I ask no more than this:
A kiss to build a dream on.Give me a kiss before you leave me,
And my imagination will feed my hungry heart.
Leave me one thing before we part,
A kiss to build a dream on.When I’m alone with my fancies, I’ll be with you,
Weaving romances, making believe they’re true.Give me your lips for just a moment,
And my imagination will make that moment live.
Give me what you alone can give,
A kiss to build a dream on!

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Music Concerts

Chick Corea: Vigilette | JAZZ NIGHT IN AMERICA (2018)

Chick Corea: Vigilette | JAZZ NIGHT IN AMERICA

chick corea sheet music pdf

This performance was recorded live by Antonio Oliart at Scullers Jazz Club in Boston, MA, on Sept. 19, 2018.

SET LIST

00:00:10​ – “On Green Dolphin Street” 00:11:06​ – “Rhumba Flamenco” 00:24:55​ – “Tempus Fugit” 00:46:51​ – “Zyryab” 01:00:35​ – “Fingerprints”

MUSICIANS

Chick Corea (Piano) Carlitos Del Puerto (Bass) Marcus Gilmore (Drums)

Pianist Chick Corea has lived many lives as a musician, from post-bop wunderkind to free-jazz maverick to fusion explorer to chamber-jazz eminence. That imprecise tally leaves out a lot in an expansive career — but, more to the point, it creates the false impression that Corea compartmentalizes his musical output, when the truth suggests something far more holistic.

Chick Corea’s sheet music available in our Library

Jazz Night in America caught up with Corea during a recent gig at Scullers in Boston — just across the river from Chelsea, Mass., where he was born and raised. He was on tour with a new trio he calls Vigilette, with Carlitos Del Puerto on bass and Marcus Gilmore on drums. The set list combined songbook standards like “On Green Dolphin Street” with originals like “Rhumba Flamenco,” each number delivered with Corea’s brand of articulate flair.

A few days after the performance, Corea sat down with Christian McBride — our host, and his longtime musical collaborator — for a collegial and far-ranging conversation. They discuss the first time Corea saw Miles Davis, an experience that changed his life, and one he recalls with absolute detail. Corea also reflects on the role of an artist: “We have a mission to go out there and be an antidote to war, and all of the dark side of what happens on Planet Earth,” he says. “We’re the ones that go in and remind people about their creativity.”

PERFORMERS

Chick Corea (piano), Carlitos Del Puerto (bass), Marcus Gilmore (drums)

Chick Corea, the man and the pianist

Corea walks one day through the door of the Blue Note on West 3rd Street, greets the staff and walks past the Yamaha grand piano on the stage to the drum set, where he begins to play. He learned to play drums when he was 8, four years after he started playing piano. Back at the keyboard, he says he thinks of his fingers as drumsticks or mallets.

“I think of the piano like that,” Corea says. “Like a great big marimba. Or a percussion instrument. There’s so many possibilities of putting it together when you’ve got 10 mallets and 88 drums.”

Corea’s touch on the piano is what sets him apart, says New York Times music critic Nate Chinen. “It’s almost like his fingers bounce off the keys,” Chinen says.

He says this holds true on the acoustic piano, but also on the Fender Rhodes electric piano, where Corea’s touch is unmistakable. “He’s one of the greatest Fender Rhodes pianists ever,” Chinen says. “His touch on that instrument is really distinctive. You know it’s him within a note or two.”

Armando “Chick” Corea was born in 1941 in Chelsea, Mass., just across the river from Boston. His father was a bebop trumpet player and his grandparents on both sides were Italian immigrants. Yet, in high school, Corea gravitated to Latin music when he joined a dance band.

“The conga player was the one who really introduced me to Latin music,” Corea says. “He showed me how to do various things with Latin music.”

Latin music influences have remained a constant throughout his career — and so has the influence of Miles Davis. Corea says he has long been a student of Davis’ work — he first heard Davis in 1947, playing trumpet with Charlie Parker on a 78 rpm recording.

In the late 1960s, Corea joined Davis’ band, where he helped pioneer the sound of jazz-rock fusion. He played on the groundbreaking records In A Silent Way and Bitches Brew.

Around the same time, Corea began a lifelong involvement with the Church of Scientology and the controversial teachings of its founder, L. Ron Hubbard. “I discovered something that I was really looking for, which is how to understand myself and other people,” Corea says. “How we operate. How we tick. And ways to keep oneself free and fresh.”

After he left Davis’ band, Corea’s musical restlessness led him to the free-form jazz quartet Circle. Then, the pianist shifted gears again and formed the group that would become his most popular band: Return to Forever. The group began as a mostly acoustic project, but then Corea decided to amp it up with an electric guitar and synthesizers. The band’s 1976 album Romantic Warrior sold half a million copies.

Lenny White, the drummer for Return to Forever in the mid-1970s, remembers how enthusiastic the group’s fans were at its 1975 concert at Wollman Rink in Central Park. He says the venue was meant to hold 7,000 people, but when fans found out that Return to Forever was playing there, they took down the gates and opened the show up to a crowd of 12,000.

“There was this power in the music,” White says. “To be able to present highbrow, intelligent music like that, and have 12,000 people screaming their heads off like they were at a rock concert.”

Although he loved connecting with those audiences, Corea moved on again, to a series of new projects that he’s continuing today: duets with pianist Herbie Hancock and vibraphonist Gary Burton, acoustic jazz combos and an electric funk band.

Chinen says he’s struck by the scope and variety of Corea’s projects. “Is there anything that he hasn’t actually attempted?” he asks.

For Corea, it’s all about collaboration. “The particular music that I love is not just casual interaction with other musicians, but actually creative interactions with other musicians,” Corea says. “It means everything.”

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Best Classical Music

Sergei Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto no. 3 with sheet music

Sergei Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto no. 3 with sheet music.

Sergei Rachmaninoff

Sergey Rachmaninoff, in full Sergey Vasilyevich Rachmaninoff, Rachmaninoff also spelled Rakhmaninov, or Rachmaninov, (born March 20 [April 1, New Style], 1873, Oneg, near Semyonovo, Russia—died March 28, 1943, Beverly Hills, California, U.S.), composer who was the last great figure of the tradition of Russian Romanticism and a leading piano virtuoso of his time. He is especially known for his piano concerti and the piece for piano and orchestra titled Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini (1934).

Early life

Rachmaninoff was born on an estate belonging to his grandparents, situated near Lake Ilmen in the Novgorod district. His father was a retired army officer and his mother the daughter of a general. The boy was destined to become an army officer until his father lost the entire family fortune through risky financial ventures and then deserted the family. Young Sergey’s cousin Aleksandr Siloti, a well-known concert pianist and conductor, sensed the boy’s abilities and suggested sending him to the noted teacher and pianist Nikolay Zverev in Moscow for his piano studies.

It is to Zverev’s strict disciplinarian treatment of the boy that musical history owes one of the great piano virtuosos of the 20th century. For his general education and theoretical subjects in music, Sergey became a pupil at the Moscow Conservatory.At age 19 he graduated from the conservatory, winning a gold medal for his one-act opera Aleko (after Aleksandr Pushkin’s poem Tsygany [“The Gypsies”]).

His fame and popularity, both as composer and concert pianist, were launched by two compositions: the Prelude in C-sharp Minor, played for the first time in public on September 26, 1892, and his Piano Concerto No. 2 in C Minor, which had its first performance in Moscow on October 27, 1901. The former piece, although it first brought Rachmaninoff to public attention, was to haunt him throughout his life—the prelude was constantly requested by his concert audiences.

The concerto, his first major success, revived his hopes after a trying period of inactivity.In his youth, Rachmaninoff was subject to emotional crises over the success or failure of his works as well as his personal relationships. Self-doubt and uncertainty carried him into deep depressions, one of the most severe of which followed the failure, on its first performance in March 1897, of his Symphony No. 1 in D Minor.

The symphony was poorly performed, and the critics condemned it. During this period, while brooding over an unhappy love affair, he was taken to a psychiatrist, Nikolay Dahl, who is often credited with having restored the young composer’s self-confidence, thus enabling him to write the Piano Concerto No. 2 (which is dedicated to Dahl).

Major creative activity

At the time of the Russian Revolution of 1905, Rachmaninoff was a conductor at the Bolshoi Theatre.

Although more of an observer than a person politically involved in the revolution, he went with his family, in November 1906, to live in Dresden. There he wrote three of his major scores: the Symphony No. 2 in E Minor (1907), the symphonic poem The Isle of the Dead (1909), and the Piano Concerto No. 3 in D Minor (1909).

The last was composed especially for his first concert tour of the United States, highlighting his much-acclaimed pianistic debut on November 28, 1909, with the New York Symphony under Walter Damrosch. Piano Concerto No. 3 requires great virtuosity from the pianist; its last movement is a bravura section as dazzling as any ever composed. In Philadelphia and Chicago he appeared with equal success in the role of conductor, interpreting his own symphonic compositions. Of these, the Symphony No. 2 is the most significant: it is a work of deep emotion and haunting thematic material.

While touring, he was invited to become permanent conductor of the Boston Symphony, but he declined the offer and returned to Russia in February 1910.

The one notable composition of Rachmaninoff’s second period of residence in Moscow was his choral symphony The Bells (1913), based on Konstantin Balmont’s Russian translation of the poem by Edgar Allan Poe. This work displays considerable ingenuity in the coupling of choral and orchestral resources to produce striking imitative and textural effects.

Later years

After the Russian Revolution of 1917, Rachmaninoff went into his second self-imposed exile, dividing his time between residences in Switzerland and the United States. Although for the next 25 years he spent most of his time in an English-speaking country, he never mastered its language or thoroughly acclimatized himself.

With his family and a small circle of friends, he lived a rather isolated life. He missed Russia and the Russian people—the sounding board for his music, as he said. And this alienation had a devastating effect on his formerly prolific creative ability.

He produced little of real originality but rewrote some of his earlier work. Indeed, he devoted himself almost entirely to concertizing in the United States and Europe, a field in which he had few peers. His only substantial works from this period are the Symphony No. 3 in A Minor (1936), another expression of sombre, Slavic melancholy, and the Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini for piano and orchestra, a set of variations on a violin caprice by Niccolò Paganini. Rachmaninoff’s last major work, the Symphonic Dances for orchestra, was composed in 1940, about two years before his death.

Legacy

Rachmaninoff’s music, although written mostly in the 20th century, remains firmly entrenched in the 19th-century musical idiom. He was, in effect, the final expression of the tradition embodied by Tchaikovsky—a melodist of Romantic dimensions still writing in an era of explosive change and experimentation.

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Music Concerts

Horace Silver Quintet Song For My Father LIVE in Copenhagen, Denmark, April 1968

Horace Silver Quintet Song For My Father live in Copenhagen, Denmark, April 1968

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Download Horace Silver’s sheet music from our Library.

Recorded live in Copenhagen, Denmark, April 1968. Song for My Father was recorded in October 1964 and released on the Blue Note label. The album was inspired by a trip that Silver had made to Brazil.

The cover artwork features a photograph of Silver’s father, John Tavares Silva, to whom the title song was dedicated. “My mother was of Irish and Negro descent, my father of Portuguese origin”, Silver recalls in the liner notes, “He was born on the island of Maio, one of the Cape Verde Islands.” The album line-up differs from the Copenhagen musicians here.

Horace Silver

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Horace Ward Martin Tavares Silver (September 2, 1928 – June 18, 2014) was an American jazz pianist, composer, and arranger, particularly in the hard bop style that he helped pioneer in the 1950s.

After playing tenor saxophone and piano at school in Connecticut, Silver got his break on piano when his trio was recruited by Stan Getz in 1950. Silver soon moved to New York City, where he developed a reputation as a composer and for his bluesy playing. Frequent sideman recordings in the mid-1950s helped further, but it was his work with the Jazz Messengers, co-led by Art Blakey, that brought both his writing and playing most attention. Their Horace Silver and the Jazz Messengers album contained Silver’s first hit, “The Preacher“.

After leaving Blakey in 1956, Silver formed his own quintet, with what became the standard small group line-up of tenor saxophone, trumpet, piano, bass, and drums. Their public performances and frequent recordings for Blue Note Records increased Silver’s popularity, even through changes of personnel. His most successful album was Song for My Father, made with two iterations of the quintet in 1963 and 1964.

Several changes occurred in the early 1970s: Silver disbanded his group to spend more time with his wife and to concentrate on composing; he included lyrics in his recordings; and his interest in spiritualism developed. The last two of these were often combined, resulting in commercially unsuccessful releases such as The United States of Mind series. Silver left Blue Note after 28 years, founded his own record label, and scaled back his touring in the 1980s, relying in part on royalties from his compositions for income. In 1993, he returned to major record labels, releasing five albums before gradually withdrawing from public view because of health problems.

As a player, Silver transitioned from bebop to hard bop by stressing melody rather than complex harmony, and combined clean and often humorous right-hand lines with darker notes and chords in a near-perpetual left-hand rumble. His compositions similarly emphasized catchy melodies, but often also contained dissonant harmonies. Many of his varied repertoire of songs, including “Doodlin’“, “Peace“, and “Sister Sadie“, became jazz standards that are still widely played. His considerable legacy encompasses his influence on other pianists and composers, and the development of young jazz talents who appeared in his bands over the course of four decades.