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The Disney songbook – Beauty and the Beast (Piano arr. by Jim Brickman)

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The Disney songbook – Beauty and the Beast (Piano arr. by Jim Brickman)

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Beauty and the Beast (1991 film)

Beauty and the Beast is a 1991 American animated musical romantic fantasy film produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation and released by Walt Disney Pictures. The 30th Disney animated feature film and the third released during the Disney Renaissance period, it is based on the 1756 French fairy tale of the same name by Jeanne-Marie Leprince de Beaumont (who was only credited in the French dub), and ideas from the 1946 French film of the same name directed by Jean Cocteau. Beauty and the Beast focuses on the relationship between the Beast (voice of Robby Benson), a prince who is magically transformed into a monster and his servants into household objects as punishment for his arrogance, and Belle (voice of Paige O’Hara), a young woman whom he imprisons in his castle. To break the curse, Beast must learn to love Belle and earn her love in return before the last petal falls from an enchanted rose or else the Beast will remain a monster forever. The film also features the voices of Richard White, Jerry Orbach, David Ogden Stiers, and Angela Lansbury.

Walt Disney first attempted to adapt Beauty and the Beast into an animated film during the 1930s and 1950s, but was unsuccessful. Following the success of The Little Mermaid (1989), Walt Disney Pictures decided to adapt the fairy tale, which Richard Purdum originally conceived as a non-musical. Disney chairman Jeffrey Katzenberg eventually dismissed Purdum’s idea and ordered that the film be a musical similar to The Little Mermaid instead. The film was directed by Gary Trousdale and Kirk Wise in their directorial debut, with a screenplay by Linda Woolverton story first credited to Roger Allers. Lyricist Howard Ashman and composer Alan Menken wrote the film’s songs. Ashman, who additionally served as the film’s executive producer, died of AIDS-related complications six months before the film’s release, and the film is thus dedicated to his memory.

Beauty and the Beast premiered as an unfinished film at the New York Film Festival on September 29, 1991, followed by its theatrical release as a completed film at the El Capitan Theatre on November 13. The film grossed $331 million at the box office worldwide on a $25 million budget and received widespread critical acclaim for its romantic narrative, animation (particularly the ballroom scene), characters and musical numbers. Beauty and the Beast won the Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy, the first animated film to ever win that category.

It also became the first animated film to be nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture at the 64th Academy Awards, where it won the Academy Award for Best Original Score and Best Original Song for its title song and received additional nominations for Best Original Song and Best Sound. In April 1994, Beauty and the Beast became Disney’s first animated film to be adapted into a Broadway musical.

An IMAX version of the film was released in 2002, and included “Human Again“, a new five-minute musical sequence that had been cut from the film prior to its release, but was included in the 1994 musical. That same year, the film was selected for preservation in the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress for being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”. After the success of the 3D re-release of The Lion King, the film was reissued in 3D in 2012. A live-action adaptation of the film directed by Bill Condon was released on March 17, 2017.

Alan Menken, composer

Alan Irwin Menken (born July 22, 1949) is an American composer, songwriter, music conductor, music director and record producer. Menken is best known for his scores and songs for films produced by Walt Disney Animation Studios. His scores and songs for The Little Mermaid (1989), Beauty and the Beast (1991), Aladdin (1992), and Pocahontas (1995) have each won him two Academy Awards. He also composed the scores and songs for Little Shop of Horrors (1986), Newsies (1992), The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1996), Hercules (1997), Home on the Range (2004), Enchanted (2007), Tangled (2010), among others. His accolades include eight Academy Awards, a Tony Award, eleven Grammy Awards, seven Golden Globe Awards, and a Daytime Emmy Award.

He is also known for his work in musical theater for Broadway and elsewhere. Some of these are based on his Disney films, but other stage hits include Little Shop of Horrors (1982), A Christmas Carol (1994), and Sister Act (2009).

Menken has collaborated with such lyricists as Lynn Ahrens, Howard Ashman, Jack Feldman, Tim Rice, Glenn Slater, Stephen Schwartz, and David Zippel. With eight Academy Award wins, Menken is the second most prolific Oscar winner in the music categories after Alfred Newman, who has 9 Oscars. He has also won 11 Grammy Awards, a Tony Award, and a Daytime Emmy Award among many other honors. Menken is one of sixteen people to have won an Oscar, an Emmy, a Grammy, and a Tony.

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Best Classical Music

Bela Bartok Mikrokosmos, complete, 6 Books

Bela Bartok Mikrokosmos, complete, the 6 Books, with sheet music

bela bartok sheet music pdf

Béla Bartók and his music

Béla Viktor János Bartók (25 March 1881 – 26 September 1945) was a Hungarian composer, pianist, and ethnomusicologist. He is considered one of the most important composers of the 20th century; he and Franz Liszt are regarded as Hungary’s greatest composers.Through his collection and analytical study of folk music, he was one of the founders of comparative musicology, which later became ethnomusicology.

Paul Wilson lists as the most prominent characteristics of Bartók’s music from late 1920s onwards the influence of the Carpathian basin and European art music, and his changing attitude toward (and use of) tonality, but without the use of the traditional harmonic functions associated with major and minor scales.

Although Bartók claimed in his writings that his music was always tonal, he rarely uses the chords or scales of tonality, and so the descriptive resources of tonal theory are of limited use. George Perle (1955) and Elliott Antokoletz (1984) focus on alternative methods of signaling tonal centers, via axes of inversional symmetry.

Others view Bartók’s axes of symmetry in terms of atonal analytic protocols. Richard Cohn (1988) argues that inversional symmetry is often a byproduct of another atonal procedure, the formation of chords from transpositionally related dyads. Atonal pitch-class theory also furnishes the resources for exploring polymodal chromaticism, projected sets, privileged patterns, and large set types used as source sets such as the equal tempered twelve tone aggregate, octatonic scale (and alpha chord), the diatonic and heptatonia secunda seven-note scales, and less often the whole tone scale and the primary pentatonic collection.

He rarely used the simple aggregate actively to shape musical structure, though there are notable examples such as the second theme from the first movement of his Second Violin Concerto, commenting that he “wanted to show Schoenberg that one can use all twelve tones and still remain tonal”. More thoroughly, in the first eight measures of the last movement of his Second Quartet, all notes gradually gather with the twelfth (G♭) sounding for the first time on the last beat of measure 8, marking the end of the first section.

The aggregate is partitioned in the opening of the Third String Quartet with C♯–D–D♯–E in the accompaniment (strings) while the remaining pitch classes are used in the melody (violin 1) and more often as 7–35 (diatonic or “white-key” collection) and 5–35 (pentatonic or “black-key” collection) such as in no. 6 of the Eight Improvisations. There, the primary theme is on the black keys in the left hand, while the right accompanies with triads from the white keys. In measures 50–51 in the third movement of the Fourth Quartet, the first violin and cello play black-key chords, while the second violin and viola play stepwise diatonic lines.

On the other hand, from as early as the Suite for piano, Op. 14 (1914), he occasionally employed a form of serialism based on compound interval cycles, some of which are maximally distributed, multi-aggregate cycles. Ernő Lendvai analyses Bartók’s works as being based on two opposing tonal systems, that of the acoustic scale and the axis system, as well as using the golden section as a structural principle.

Milton Babbitt, in his 1949 critique of Bartók’s string quartets, criticized Bartók for using tonality and non-tonal methods unique to each piece. Babbitt noted that “Bartók’s solution was a specific one, it cannot be duplicated”. Bartók’s use of “two organizational principles”—tonality for large scale relationships and the piece-specific method for moment to moment thematic elements—was a problem for Babbitt, who worried that the “highly attenuated tonality” requires extreme non-harmonic methods to create a feeling of closure.

The cataloguing of Bartók’s works is somewhat complex. Bartók assigned opus numbers to his works three times, the last of these series ending with the Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 1, Op. 21 in 1921. He ended this practice because of the difficulty of distinguishing between original works and ethnographic arrangements, and between major and minor works. Since his death, three attempts—two full and one partial—have been made at cataloguing.

The first, and still most widely used, is András Szőllősy‘s chronological Sz. numbers, from 1 to 121. Denijs Dille subsequently reorganised the juvenilia (Sz. 1–25) thematically, as DD numbers 1 to 77. The most recent catalogue is that of László Somfai; this is a chronological index with works identified by BB numbers 1 to 129, incorporating corrections based on the Béla Bartók Thematic Catalogue. On 1 January 2016, his works entered the public domain in the European Union.

Mikrokosmos

Béla Bartók‘s Mikrokosmos Sz. 107, BB 105 consists of 153 progressive piano pieces in six volumes written between 1926 and 1939. The individual pieces progress from very easy and simple beginner études to very difficult advanced technical displays, and are used in modern piano lessons and education. In total, according to Bartók, the piece “appears as a synthesis of all the musical and technical problems which were treated and in some cases only partially solved in the previous piano works.”

Volumes one and two are dedicated to his son Péter, while volumes five and six are intended as professionally performable concert pieces. Bartók also indicated that these pieces could also be played on other instruments; Huguette Dreyfus for example has recorded pieces from Books 3 through 6 on the harpsichord.

In 1940, shortly before they emigrated to the United States, he arranged seven of the pieces for two pianos, to provide additional repertoire for himself and his wife Ditta Pásztory-Bartók to play.

Volumes

All of the six volumes progress in difficulty, namely:

  • Volumes I and II: Pieces 1–36 and 37–66, beginner level
  • Volumes III and IV: Pieces 67–96 and 97–121, moderate to advanced level
  • Volumes V and VI: 122–139 and 140–153, professional level

The list of pieces is as follows:

Volume I Six Unison Melodies (I) (a) Six Unison Melodies (II) (b) Six Unison Melodies (II) Six Unison Melodies (III) Six Unison Melodies (IV) Six Unison Melodies (V) Six Unison Melodies (VI) Dotted Notes Repetition (1) Syncopation (I) With Alternate Hands Parallel Motion Reflection Change of Position Question and Answer Village Song Parallel Motion with Change of Position Contrary Motion Four Unison Melodies (I) Four Unison Melodies (II) Four Unison Melodies (III) Four Unison Melodies (IV) Imitation and Counterpoint Imitation and Inversion (I) Pastorale Imitation and Inversion (II) Repetition (II) Syncopation (II) Canon at the Octave Imitation Reflected Canon at the Lower Fifth Dance in Canon Form In Dorian Mode Slow Dance In Phrygian Mode Chorale Free CanonVolume II In Lydian Mode Staccato and Legato (I) Staccato and Legato (Canon) In Yugoslav Style Melody with Accompaniment Accompaniment in Broken Triads (a) In Hungarian Style (for two pianos) (b) In Hungarian Style Contrary Motion (2) (for two pianos) Meditation Increasing-Diminishing County Fair In Mixolydian Mode Crescendo-Diminuendo Minuetto Waves Unison Divided In Transylvanian Style Chromatics Triplets in Lydian Mode (for two pianos) Melody in Tenths Accents In Oriental Style Major and Minor Canon with Sustained Notes Pentatonic Melody Minor Sixths in Parallel Motion Buzzing (a) Line against Point (b) Line against Point Dialogue (with voice) Melody DividedVolume III Thirds against a Single Voice Hungarian Dance (for two pianos) Study in Chords Melody against Double Notes Thirds Dragons’ Dance Sixths and Triads (a) Hungarian Matchmaking Song (b) Hungarian Matchmaking Song (with voice) Triplets In Three Parts Little Study Five-Tone Scale Hommage à Johann Sebastian Bach Hommage à Robert Schumann Wandering Scherzo Melody with Interruptions Merriment Broken Chords Two Major Pentachords Variations Duet for Pipes In Four Parts (I) In Russian Style Chromatic Invention (I) Chromatic Invention (II) In Four Parts (II) Once Upon a Time… (a) Fox Song (b) Fox Song (with voice) Jolts
Volume IV Notturno Thumbs Under Hands Crossing In Folk Song Style Diminished Fifth Harmonics Minor and Major (a) Wandering through the Keys (b) Wandering through the Keys Game (with Two Five-Tone Scales) Children’s Song Melody in the Mist Wrestling From the Island of Bali And the Sounds Clash and Clang… Intermezzo Variations on a Folk Tune Bulgarian Rhythm (I) Theme and Inversion Bulgarian Rhythm (II) Song Bourrée Triplets in 9
8 Time
Dance in 3
4 Time
Triads Two-Part Study
Volume V Chords Together and in Opposition (a) Staccato and Legato (II) (b) Staccato and Legato (II) Staccato Boating Change of Time New Hungarian Folk Song (with voice) Stamping Dance Alternating Thirds Village Joke Fourths Major Seconds Broken and Together Syncopation (III) (a) Studies in Double Notes (b) Studies in Double Notes (c) Studies in Double Notes Perpetuum mobile Whole-Tone Scales Unison Bagpipe Music Merry Andrew

Volume VI

  1. Free Variations
  2. Subject and Reflection
  3. From the Diary of a Fly
  4. Divided Arpeggios
  5. Minor Seconds, Major Sevenths
  6. (a) Chromatic Invention (III)(b) Chromatic Invention (III)
  7. Ostinato
  8. March
  9. Six Dances in Bulgarian Rhythm (I)
  10. Six Dances in Bulgarian Rhythm (II)
  11. Six Dances in Bulgarian Rhythm (III)
  12. Six Dances in Bulgarian Rhythm (IV)
  13. Six Dances in Bulgarian Rhythm (V)
  14. Six Dances in Bulgarian Rhythm (VI)

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Best Classical Music

Béla Bartók Piano Sonata, Sz. 80 with sheet music

Béla Bartók Piano Sonata, Sz. 80 with sheet music

bela bartok sheet music pdf
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Film Music

Moon River (Henry Mancini) Piano solo

Moon River (Henry Mancini) Piano solo with sheet music

moon river free sheet music & scores pdf