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Jazz & Blues Music

Billie Holiday – When You’re Smiling

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Billie Holiday When You’re Smiling with sheet music

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When You’re Smiling” is a popular song written by Larry Shay, Mark Fisher and Joe Goodwin in 1928. It bears resemblance to the Spanish CanciónAmapola” by José María Lacalle García. Early popular recordings were by Seger Ellis (1928), Louis Armstrong (1929), and Ted Wallace & His Campus Boys (1930).

Lyrics

When you’re smilin’
When you’re smilin’
The whole world, it smiles with you
When you’re laughin’
Babe, when you’re laughin’
Well, the sun comes shinin’ throughBut when you’re cryin’
You know you bring on the rain
Stop that sighin’
Be happy againKeep on smilin’

‘Cause when you’re smilin’
The whole world smiles with you
(Ah, let’s go)’Cause when you’re cryin’
You bring on the rain
Stop that sighin’
Be happy againKeep on smilin’

‘Cause when you’re smilin’
The whole world smiles with youWhen you’re smilin’ (when you’re smilin’)
When you’re smilin’ (keep on smilin’)
The whole world, it smiles with you
When you’re laughin’ (keep on smilin’ now)
When you’re laughin’ (you’ll get through somehow)
The sun comes shinin’ through (when I’m with you)But when you’re cryin’
You know you bring on the rain
Stop that sighin’

Come on, be happy againKeep on smilin’
When you’re smilin’, baby
The whole world, it smiles with you
The whole world, it smiles with you

A standard song

“When You’re Smiling” was written by Mark Fisher, Larry Shay and Joe Goodwin. According to Thomas S. Hischak in The Tin Pan Alley Song Encyclopedia, “Seger Ellis popularized the tune, but it was Louis Armstrong who made it a standard.” (Ellis was a songwriter/pianist/vocalist popular in the ‘20s and early ‘30s.) Armstrong first recorded it in 1929 and then again in 1932 and 1956.

His is the version heard in the 1984 film The Cotton Club. The song has appeared in several other films, including Meet Danny Wilson (1952) in which it was sung by Frank Sinatra, and it was the title cut of a 1950 movie in which it was sung by Frankie Laine.

The lyric advocates a cheerful attitude because “when you’re smilin’, the whole world smiles with you.” Conversely, “when you’re cryin’, you bring on the rain.”

“When You’re Smiling” has been recorded by vocalist Eddie Jefferson; the big bands of Count Basie, Stan Kenton, and Duke Ellington; the Dave Brubeck Quartet; saxophonist Art Pepper; guitarist Joe Pass; and many Dixieland groups.

In The Swing Era: The Development of Jazz, 1930-1945, Gunther Schuller highlights Billie Holiday’s recording of the song: “‘Lady Day,’ so named by Lester [Young], and ‘Prez,’ so named by Billie, were obviously musical soulmates and inspired each other…. ‘When You’re Smiling’ (January 1938) is a superior example of their collaboration….”

Recent recordings, however, are sparse. Drummer Bill Stewart and his group of contemporary musicians (Joe Lovano, Dave Holland, and Marc Copland) improvised on it in 1990; trumpeter Warren Vache featured it with the New York City All-Star Big Band in 2000, and Mike Barone’s Big Band recorded it in 2005.

billie holiday free sheet music pdf

Billie Holiday

Billie Holiday, birth name Elinore Harris, byname Lady Day, (born April 7, 1915, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.—died July 17, 1959, New York City, New York), American jazz singer, one of the greatest from the 1930s to the ’50s.

Eleanora (her preferred spelling) Harris was the daughter of Clarence Holiday, a professional musician who for a time played guitar with the Fletcher Henderson band. She and her mother used her maternal grandfather’s surname, Fagan, for a time; then in 1920 her mother married a man surnamed Gough, and both she and Eleanora adopted his name. It is probable that in neither case did her mother have Eleanora’s name legally changed.

The singer later adopted her natural father’s last name and took the name Billie from a favourite movie actress, Billie Dove. In 1928 she moved with her mother from Baltimore, Maryland (where she had spent her childhood), to New York City, and after three years of subsisting by various means, she found a job singing in a Harlem nightclub. She had had no formal musical training, but, with an instinctive sense of musical structure and with a wealth of experience gathered at the root level of jazz and blues, she developed a singing style that was deeply moving and individual.

In 1933 Holiday made her first recordings, with Benny Goodman and others. Two years later a series of recordings with Teddy Wilson and members of Count Basie’s band brought her wider recognition and launched her career as the leading jazz singer of her time. She toured with Basie and with Artie Shaw in 1937 and 1938 and in the latter year opened at the plush Café Society in New York City. About 1940 she began to perform exclusively in cabarets and in concert. Her recordings between 1936 and 1942 marked her peak years. During that period she was often associated with saxophonist Lester Young, who gave her the nickname “Lady Day.”

In 1947 Holiday was arrested for a narcotics violation and spent a year in a rehabilitation centre. No longer able to obtain a cabaret license to work in New York City, Holiday nonetheless packed New York’s Carnegie Hall 10 days after her release. She continued to perform in concert and in clubs outside of New York City, and she made several tours during her later years. Her constant struggle with heroin addiction ravaged her voice, although not her technique.

Holiday’s dramatic intensity rendered the most banal lyric profound. Among the songs identified with her were “Strange Fruit,” “Fine and Mellow,” “The Man I Love,” “Billie’s Blues,” “God Bless the Child,” and “I Wished on the Moon.” The vintage years of Holiday’s professional and private liaison with Young were marked by some of the best recordings of the interplay between a vocal line and an instrumental obbligato.

In 1956 she wrote an autobiography, Lady Sings the Blues (with William Dufty), that was made into a motion picture starring Diana Ross in 1972. Holiday’s health began to fail because of drug and alcohol abuse, and she died in 1959.

billie holiday sheet music pdf
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Jazz & Blues Music

White Christmas – Ella Fitzgerald (Music by Irving Berlin)

Ready to Jazz your Christmas up? Now you can do using our large variety of piano & guitar sheet music books in our Library.

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    Piano Solo version (with sheet music):

    Ella Fitzgerald sings White Christmas

    Sheet Music Lyrics

    I’m dreaming of a white Christmas
    Just like the ones I used to know
    Where the tree tops glisten
    And children listen
    To hear sleigh bells in the snowI’m dreaming of a white Christmas
    With every Christmas card I write
    May your days, may your days, may your days
    Be merry and bright
    And may all your Christmas’ be whiteI’m dreaming of a white Christmas
    Just like the ones I used to know
    Where the tree tops glisten
    And children listen
    To hear sleigh bells in the snowI’m dreaming of a white Christmas
    With every Christmas card I write
    May your days, may your days, may your days
    Be merry and bright
    May all your Christmas’ be whiteI’m dreaming of a white Christmas
    With every Christmas card I write
    May your days, be merry and bright
    And may all your Christmas’ be white

    White Christmas is an Irving Berlin song reminiscing about an old-fashioned Christmas setting, released in 1942. The version sung by Bing Crosby is the world’s best-selling single with estimated sales in excess of 50 million copies worldwide. When the figures for other versions of the song are added to Crosby’s, sales of the song exceed 100 million. The original sheet music can be found in our Library.

    white christmas sheet music pdf
    free sheet music & scores pdf

    Irving Berlin (born Israel Beilin; May 11, 1888–September 22, 1989) was an American composer and lyricist, widely considered one of the greatest songwriters in American history. His music forms a great part of the Great American Songbook. Born in Imperial Russia, Berlin arrived in the United States at the age of five. He published his first song, “Marie from Sunny Italy”, in 1907, receiving 33 cents for the publishing rights,and had his first major international hit, “Alexander’s Ragtime Band“, in 1911. He also was an owner of the Music Box Theatre on Broadway. It is commonly believed that Berlin could not read sheet music, and was such a limited piano player that he could only play in the key of F-sharp using his custom piano equipped with a transposing lever.

    “Alexander’s Ragtime Band” sparked an international dance craze in places as far away as Berlin’s native Russia, which also “flung itself into the ragtime beat with an abandon bordering on mania.” Over the years he was known for writing music and lyrics in the American vernacular: uncomplicated, simple and direct, with his stated aim being to “reach the heart of the average American,” whom he saw as the “real soul of the country.” In doing so, said Walter Cronkite, at Berlin’s 100th birthday tribute, he “helped write the story of this country, capturing the best of who we are and the dreams that shape our lives.”

    free sheet music & scores pdf download

    He wrote hundreds of songs, many becoming major hits, which made him famous before he turned thirty. During his 60-year career he wrote an estimated 1,500 songs, including the scores for 20 original Broadway shows and 15 original Hollywood films, with his songs nominated eight times for Academy Awards. Many songs became popular themes and anthems, including “Alexander’s Ragtime Band“, “Easter Parade“, “Puttin’ on the Ritz“, “Cheek to Cheek“, “White Christmas“, “Happy Holiday“, “Anything You Can Do (I Can Do Better)“, and “There’s No Business Like Show Business“. His Broadway musical and 1943 film This is the Army, with Ronald Reagan, had Kate Smith singing Berlin’s “God Bless America” which was first performed in 1938.

    Berlin’s songs have reached the top of the charts 25 times and have been extensively re-recorded by numerous singers including The Andrews Sisters, Perry Como, Eddie Fisher, Al Jolson, Fred Astaire, Ethel Merman, Louis Armstrong, Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Elvis Presley, Judy Garland, Barbra Streisand, Linda Ronstadt, Rosemary Clooney, Cher, Diana Ross, Bing Crosby, Sarah Vaughan, Ruth Etting, Fanny Brice, Marilyn Miller, Rudy Vallée, Nat King Cole, Billie Holiday, Doris Day, Jerry Garcia, Willie Nelson, Bob Dylan, Leonard Cohen, Ella Fitzgerald, Michael Buble, Lady Gaga, and Christina Aguilera.

    Berlin died in 1989 at the age of 101. Composer Douglas Moore sets Berlin apart from all other contemporary songwriters, and includes him instead with Stephen Foster, Walt Whitman, and Carl Sandburg, as a “great American minstrel”—someone who has “caught and immortalized in his songs what we say, what we think about, and what we believe.” Composer George Gershwin called him “the greatest songwriter that has ever lived”,and composer Jerome Kern concluded that “Irving Berlin has no place in American music—he is American music.”

    List of Irving Berlin songs:

    Ella Jane Fitzgerald (April 25, 1917–June 15, 1996) was an American jazz singer, sometimes referred to as the First Lady of Song, Queen of Jazz, and Lady Ella. She was noted for her purity of tone, impeccable diction, phrasing, timing, intonation, and a “horn-like” improvisational ability.

    After a tumultuous adolescence, Fitzgerald found stability in musical success with the Chick Webb Orchestra, performing across the country but most often associated with the Savoy Ballroom in Harlem. Her rendition of the nursery rhyme “A-Tisket, A-Tasket” helped boost both her and Webb to national fame. After taking over the band when Webb died, Fitzgerald left it behind in 1942 to start her solo career.

    Her manager was Moe Gale, co-founder of the Savoy,until she turned the rest of her career over to Norman Granz, who founded Verve Records to produce new records by Fitzgerald. With Verve she recorded some of her more widely noted works, particularly her interpretations of the Great American Songbook.

    While Fitzgerald appeared in movies and as a guest on popular television shows in the second half of the twentieth century, her musical collaborations with Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, and The Ink Spots were some of her most notable acts outside of her solo career. These partnerships produced some of her best-known songs such as “Dream a Little Dream of Me“, “Cheek to Cheek“, “Into Each Life Some Rain Must Fall“, and “It Don’t Mean a Thing (If It Ain’t Got That Swing)“.

    In 1993, after a career of nearly 60 years, she gave her last public performance. Three years later, she died at the age of 79 after years of declining health. Her accolades included fourteen Grammy Awards, the National Medal of Arts, and the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

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