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A History of the Blues

Delta Blues Sounds – Best Of The Mississippi Delta’s Stars

Tracklist: 00:00 – Doctor Ross – Doctor Ross Boogie 02:35 – Arthur Big Boy Crudup – Rock Me Mama 05:31 – Muddy Waters – I feel Like Going Home 08:37 – Robert Johnson – Preachin’ Blues 11:26 – Son House – Death Letter Blues 14:54 – Mississippi Fred McDowell – Shake Em On Down 17:35 – Sonny Boy Williamson – The Blues That Made Me Drunk 20:36 – Elmore James – Can’t Stop Lovin’ You 22:50 – Eddie Burns – Biscuit Baking Mama 25:19 – Jimmy Rogers – Walkin’ By Myself 28:05 – Big Joe Williams – King Biscuit Stomp 30:37 – Bukka White – Parchman Farm Blues 33:17 – Robert Lockwood Jr – Little Boy Blue 36:20 – Bo Carter – My Pencil Won’t Write No More 39:16 – James Cotton, Willie Nix – Baker Shop Boogie 41:59 – Ishman Bracey – Brown Mama Blues 45:37 – Muddy Waters – Hoochie Coochie Man 48:26 – Robert Johnson – Dead Shrimp Blues 50:55 – B.B. King – Please Love Me 53:42 – Robert Petway – Rockin’ Chair Blues 56:36 – John Lee Hooker – Union Station Blues 59:32 – Tommy Johnson – Cool Drink of Water Blues 01:03:07 – Tom McClennan – Highway N°51 01:05:56 – Willie Brown – Future Blues 01:08:53 – King Solomon Hill – Tell Me Baby 01:12:21 – Tommy Johnson – Canned Heat Blues 01:15:58 – Bo Carter – The Ins and Out of My Girl 01:19:03 – Caldwell Bracey – You Scolded Me 01:22:21 – Charlie McCoy – Last Time Blues 01:25:23 – Willie Lofton – Dirty Mistreater 01:28:10 – Joe Calicott – Travelin’ Mama Blues 01:31:22 – Muddy Waters – I Be’s Troubled 01:34:27 – Skip James – Devil Got My Woman 01:37:25 – Big Joe Williams – Baby Please Don’t Go 01:39:05 – Tony Hollins – Crawlin’ King Snake 01:42:12 – Robert Petway – Cattfish Blues 01:45:03 – John Lee Hooker – Landing Blues 01:48:29 – Elmore James – Standing At the Crossroads 01:51:16 – Gus Cannon – Poor Boy Long Way From Home 01:54:26 – Ishman Bracey – Leavin’ Town Blues 01:58:04 – Garfield Akers – Cottonfield Blues 02:00:58 – The Mississippi Sheiks – Sitting On Top of the World

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Delta Blues Sounds free sheet music & pdf scores download
Delta Blues Sounds free sheet music & scores pdf

Delta Blues Sounds – Best Of The Mississippi Delta’s Stars

Categories
A History of the Blues

A History of the Blues – Robert Johnson – Sweet Home Chicago

“Sweet Home Chicago” is a blues standard first recorded by Robert Johnson in 1936. Although he is often credited as the songwriter, several songs have been identified as precedents. The song has become a popular anthem for the city of Chicago despite ambiguity in Johnson’s original lyrics. Numerous artists have interpreted the song in a variety of styles.

All five of Chicago’s sports teams have played the song at their games in one form or another.

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A History of the Blues

A HISTORY OF THE BLUES – Muddy Waters – I Just Want To Make Love With You

A HISTORY OF THE BLUES – Muddy Waters – I Just Want To Make Love With You

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A History of the Blues

A History of the Blues – Memphis Slim – Don’t You Tell Nobody

A History of the Blues – Memphis Slim – Don’t You Tell Nobody

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A History of the Blues

A History of the Blues – Muddy Waters – I’m Ready

I’m Ready is a studio album by Chicago blues veteran Muddy Waters. The second of his Johnny Winter-produced albums for the Blue Sky Records label, I’m Ready was issued one year after he found renewed commercial and critical success with Hard Again and earned him a Grammy Award in 1978. It was reissued in 2004 by the Epic/Legacy label with three additional songs.

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A History of the Blues

A History of the Blues – Howlin’ Wolf – Poor Boy

A History of the Blues – Howlin’ Wolf – Poor Boy

A History of the Blues – Howlin’ Wolf – Poor Boy
Chester Arthur Burnett (June 10, 1910 – January 10, 1976), known as Howlin’ Wolf, was a Chicago blues singer, guitarist, and harmonica player. Originally from Mississippi, he moved to Chicago in adulthood and became successful, forming a rivalry with fellow bluesman Muddy Waters. With a booming voice and imposing physical presence, he is one of the best-known Chicago blues artists.

The musician and critic Cub Koda noted, “no one could match Howlin’ Wolf for the singular ability to rock the house down to the foundation while simultaneously scaring its patrons out of its wits.] Producer Sam Phillips recalled, “When I heard Howlin’ Wolf, I said, ‘This is for me. This is where the soul of man never dies.'” Several of his songs, including “Smokestack Lightnin'”, “Killing Floor” and “Spoonful”, have become blues and blues rock standards. In 2011, Rolling Stone magazine ranked him number 54 on its list of the “100 Greatest Artists of All Time”
“Poor Boy Blues”, or “Poor Boy, Long Ways From Home”, is a traditional blues song of unknown origin. As with most traditional blues songs, there is great variation in the melody and lyrical content as performed by different artists. However, there is often a core verse containing some variation of the line “I’m a poor boy a long way from home.” The song is often associated with a slide guitar accompaniment. Gus Cannon recalled hearing a slide guitarist named Alec or Alex Lee in Coahoma County around 1900, playing a version of the song.[1] Cannon himself, under the pseudonym Banjo Joe, later recorded the song.

The song is often cited as one of the oldest in the blues genre. Bo Weavil Jackson (as “Sam Butler”) recorded the song in Chicago in 1926 for Vocalion Records.

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A History of the Blues

A History of the Blues – Screamin’ Jay Hawkins – I Put A Spell On You

JalacyScreamin’ JayHawkins (July 18, 1929 – February 12, 2000) was an American singer-songwriter, musician, actor, film producer, and boxer. Famed chiefly for his powerful, operatic vocal delivery and wildly theatrical performances of songs such as “I Put a Spell on You“, he sometimes used macabre props onstage, making him an early pioneer of shock rock.

I put a spell on you
Because you’re mineYou better stop the things you do
I tell ya I ain’t lyin’
I ain’t lyin’You know I can’t stand it
You’re runnin’ around
You know better daddy
I can’t stand it ’cause you put me down
Oh noI put a spell on you
Because you’re mineYou know I love you
I love you
I love you
I love you anyhow
And I don’t care if you don’t want me
I’m yours right nowI put a spell on you
Because you’re mineYou know I can’t stand it
Your running around
You know baby daddy
I can’t stand it
‘Cause you put me downOoo I put a spell on you
Because you’re mine
Because you’re mineBecause you’re mine
Oh yeah

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A History of the Blues

A History of the Blues – Howlin’ Wolf – Louise

Chester Arthur Burnett (June 10, 1910 – January 10, 1976), known as Howlin’ Wolf, was a Chicago blues singer, guitarist, and harmonica player. Originally from Mississippi, he moved to Chicago in adulthood and became successful, forming a rivalry with fellow bluesman Muddy Waters. With a booming voice and imposing physical presence, he is one of the best-known Chicago blues artists.

The musician and critic Cub Koda noted, “no one could match Howlin’ Wolf for the singular ability to rock the house down to the foundation while simultaneously scaring its patrons out of its wits.” Producer Sam Phillips recalled, “When I heard Howlin’ Wolf, I said, ‘This is for me. This is where the soul of man never dies.'” Several of his songs, including “Smokestack Lightnin'”, “Killing Floor” and “Spoonful”, have become blues and blues rock standards. In 2011, Rolling Stone magazine ranked him number 54 on its list of the “100 Greatest Artists of All Time”.

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A History of the Blues

A History of the Blues – B.B.King – City of New Orleans

A History of the Blues – B.B.King – City of New Orleans
New Orleans blues, is a subgenre of blues music and a variation of Louisiana blues that developed in the 1940s and 1950s in and around the city of New Orleans, rooted by the rich blues roots of the city going back generations earlier. Strongly influenced by jazz and incorporated Caribbean influences, it is dominated by piano and saxophone but has also produced major guitar bluesmen. Major figures in the genre include Professor Longhair and Guitar Slim, who both produced major regional, R&B chart and even mainstream hits.

As a style New Orleans blues is primarily driven by piano and horn, enlivened by Caribbean rhythms and Dixieland music. It is generally cheerful in delivery regardless of the subject matter, with a laid back tempo and complex rhythms falling just behind the beat. Vocals range from laid-back crooning to full-throated gospel shouting.

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A History of the Blues

A History of the Blues – Big Bill Broonzy – John Henry

Big Bill Broonzy (born Lee Conley Bradley, June 26, 1903– August 14, 1958) was an American blues singer, songwriter and guitarist. His career began in the 1920s, when he played country blues to mostly African-American audiences. Through the 1930s and 1940s he successfully navigated a transition in style to a more urban blues sound popular with working-class African-American audiences. In the 1950s a return to his traditional folk-blues roots made him one of the leading figures of the emerging American folk music revival and an international star. His long and varied career marks him as one of the key figures in the development of blues music in the 20th century.

Broonzy copyrighted more than 300 songs during his lifetime, including both adaptations of traditional folk songs and original blues songs. As a blues composer, he was unique in writing songs that reflected his rural-to-urban experiences.[