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Disney Movie Music

Disney Baby Mine Jim Brickman, piano

Disney Baby Mine Jim Brickman, piano with sheet music

Disney sheet music

Lyrics:

Lyrics:
Baby mine, don’t you cry
Baby mine, dry your eyes
Rest your head close to my heart
Never to part
Baby of mine
Little one, when you play
Don’t you mind what they say
Let those eyes sparkle and shine
Never a tear
Baby of mine
From your head to your toes (Baby mine)
You’re so sweet, goodness knows (Baby mine)
You are so precious to me
Cute as can be
Baby of mine
Baby mine
Baby mine

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Disney Movie Music

When I See An Elephant Fly (Disney) Piano arrangement by Jim Brickman

When I See An Elephant Fly (Disney) Piano arrangement by Jim Brickman

When I See An Elephant Fly (Disney) Piano arrangement by Jim Brickman with sheet music TO DOWNLOAD from our Library.

Jim Brickman (born November 20, 1961) is an American songwriter and pianist of pop music, as well as a radio show host. Brickman has earned six Gold and Platinum albums. He is known for his solo piano compositions, pop-style instrumentals, and vocal collaborations with artists such as Lady Antebellum, Johnny Mathis, Michael W. Smith, Martina McBride, Megan Hilty, Donny Osmond, Delta Goodrem, Olivia Newton-John, and many others. He has earned two Grammy nominations for his albums Peace (2003) for Best Instrumental, and Faith (2009) for Best New Age Album; an SESAC “Songwriter of the Year” award; a Canadian Country Music Award for Best Vocal/Instrumental Collaboration; and a Dove Award presented by the Gospel Music Association.

Since 1997, he has hosted his own radio show, “The Jim Brickman Show”, which is carried on radio stations throughout the United States.Brickman has also released five PBS specials, and hosts an annual fan cruise or bash. He is founder of Brickhouse Direct, a company that provides strategic marketing and e-commerce solutions for clients in a variety of industries.

Jim’s career has spanned over 25 years.

He has transformed the popularity of solo piano playing his original, pop-style instrumentals and inviting star-studded vocal collaborators to join in. He has since become the most charted Adult Contemporary artist and best selling solo pianist to date.

Instead of listing every album over Jim’s entire career we’ll just start here.

Disney Music

From the founding of The Walt Disney Company in 1923, music has been key to the success of the organization. Both public-domain and original music were used for the initial cartoons, but, since neither Walt Disney nor Roy O. Disney had any music industry experience, the studio had to rely on outside music publishers.In 1928, Walt Disney released the first Mickey Mouse motion picture, Steamboat Willie, which became the first animated short-subject film with sound. Two other unreleased Mickey Mouse shorts has been previously-produced and were subsequently given soundtracks prior to their eventual premieres. In 1929, Walt Disney and Carl Stalling wrote “Minnie’s Yoo-Hoo”, the first song from the Walt Disney Studios, for Mickey’s Follies. On December 16, 1929, the Disney Film Recording Company, Limited was incorporated as a subsidiary of Walt Disney Productions.

Saul Bourne at Irving Berlin Music approached the studio after seeing Three Little Pigs with interest in the publishing rights for its theme song, “Who’s Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf?“. With Disney partnering with Bourne and Berlin, this partnership led to the song being recorded twice by the Don Bestor Orchestra (released by Victor Records) and Bill Scotti Orchestra (released by Bluebird Records). The song was a hit and a Depression era anthem.

Walt Disney Productions then began licensing out its music with the record company either selecting its own or Disney’s talent to record the music. Until 1936, no one had issued an actual song track recording on disc. RCA‘s HMV label released a selection of Disney short film music in England with the US release a year later. The Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs soundtrack album released by Victor was the first feature film soundtrack. Disney had sold its rights to the Snow White music to Bourne Co. Music as they needed more funds to complete the film.

In 1938, Fantasound—the first Surround sound system—was designed and tested by Walt Disney Productions for the release of Fantasia. In 1943, Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences nominated Walt Disney Productions for two Academy Award categories in recognition of Bambi; Music, Scoring of a Dramatic or Comedy Picture and Music, Best Song for its song, “Love is a Song”.

In addition to Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Disney also sold the music publishing rights to Pinocchio and Dumbo to Bourne. To date, all attempts to reacquire the music rights to the three films had failed. After Bambi, the effects of World War II reduced the production of new feature length animation, with Disney either making feature length live films with some animation or themed short film into anthology films like Make Mine Music. The latter films contain the bulk of the more commercial music which was done by recording stars thus released by their record company.

In April 1947, the Walt Disney Music Company (WDMC) was incorporated, with Fred Raphael putting the company together in late 1949 to publish and license songs from Cinderella. Cinderella records appeared in stores along with other merchandise in 1949 before the 1950 release of the movie. The original RCA 78 RPM multi-disc-album release was number 1 on the Billboard magazine pop charts and as a result, Disney Music was moving rapidly into the Big Business category. While WDMC did not produce the records, Raphael did handle the selection, performance and recording.

James Alexander “Jimmy” Johnson, Jr., a fired Disney publicity staff member who wanted to stay at Disney, moved through a series of jobs there in the traffic department, and then accounting. After a stint in the military, he became assistant to the corporate secretary, then handled merchandising issues among other additional duties. With Roy Disney’s split of the merchandising division from Walt Disney Productions, Johnson became head of the merchandising division’s publication department in 1950 and took on managing business affairs for the Walt Disney Music Company.

Raphael took the WDMC into creating original non-film music. WDMC had several successful songs outside of the films, including Mule Train by Frankie Laine, “Would I Love You (Love You, Love You)” by Patti Page and “Shrimp Boats” by Jo Stafford, however for every non-film hit there were a score more that flopped. While Alice in Wonderland was a first run failure, its songs became evergreen for the music company with multiple stars performing the music. Raphael moved his office off lot to Hollywood and opened a WDMC in New York.

Walt Disney Productions formed the Wonderland Music Company in 1951.

Disney’s next push into music came from The Mickey Mouse Club as eight 6-inch 78 RPM records for the show hit shelves the week it premiered on television. Normal 7-inch 45 RPM versions were cut and released later, both through manufacturing partners of the Walt Disney Music Company. After a year, Golden Records and Am-Par Records turned over production of the show’s music back to Disney, leading to the creation of the Disneyland Records label in 1956.

sheet music
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Disney Movie Music

Cruella De Vil (Disney) Jim Brickman, piano

Cruella De Vil (Disney) — Jim Brickman, piano solo with sheet music

One Hundred and One Dalmatians is a 1961 American animated adventure film produced by Walt Disney Productions and based on the 1956 novel The Hundred and One Dalmatians by Dodie Smith. Directed by Clyde Geronimi, Hamilton Luske, and Wolfgang Reitherman, it was Disney’s 17th animated feature film. The film tells the story of a litter of Dalmatian puppies who are kidnapped by the villainous Cruella de Vil (“deVille”), who wants to use their fur to make into coats. Their parents, Pongo and Perdita, set out to save their children from Cruella, in the process rescuing 84 additional puppies that were bought in pet shops, bringing the total of Dalmatians to 101.

The film was originally released to theaters on January 25, 1961, by Buena Vista Distribution, and was a box office success, pulling the studio out of the financial slump caused by Sleeping Beauty, a costlier production released two years prior. Aside from its box office revenue, its commercial success was due to the employment of inexpensive animation techniques—such as using xerography during the process of inking and painting traditional animation cels—that kept production costs down. Disney released the live-action adaptation 101 Dalmatians in 1996 and a sequel, 102 Dalmatians in 2000, a direct to video animated sequel 101 Dalmatians II: Patch’s London Adventure in 2003 and a live-action spin-off/prequel called Cruella directed by Craig Gillespie is scheduled to be released on May 28, 2021.

In order to have music involved in the narrative, Peet used an old theater trick by which the protagonist is a down-and-out songwriter. However, unlike the previous animated Disney films at the time, the songs were not composed by a team, but by Mel Leven who composed both lyrics and music.[10] Previously, Leven had composed songs for the UPA animation studio in which animators, who transferred to work at Disney, had recommended him to Walt. His first assignment was to compose “Cruella de Vil”, of which Leven composed three versions. The final version used in the film was composed as a “bluesy number” prior to a meeting with Walt in forty-five minutes.

The other two songs included in the film are “Kanine Krunchies Jingle” (sung by Lucille Bliss, who voiced Anastasia Tremaine in Disney’s 1950 film Cinderella), and “Dalmatian Plantation” in which only two lines are sung by Roger at its closure. Leven had also written additional songs that were not included in the film. The first song, “Don’t Buy a Parrot from a Sailor”, a cockney chant, was meant to be sung by Jasper and Horace at the De Vil Mansion. A second song, “Cheerio, Good-Bye, Toodle-oo, Hip Hip!” was to be sung by the dalmatian puppies as they make their way into London. A third song titled “March of the One Hundred and One” was meant for the dogs to sing after escaping Cruella by van. Different, longer versions of “Kanine Krunchies Jingle” and “Dalmatian Plantation” appear on the Disneyland Records read-along album based on the film.

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Disney Movie Music

Disney – Mary Poppins Medley – Jim Brickman, piano (with sheet music)

Disney – Mary Poppins Medley – Jim Brickman, piano (with sheet music)

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Disney Movie Music

Disney – Someday My Prince Will Come – Jim Brickman, piano

Disney – Someday My Prince Will Come – Jim Brickman, piano

Sheet Music book available in our Library:
sheetmusiclibrary.website

(AUDIO only, as no Disney images can be displayed due to Copyright restrictions)

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Disney Movie Music

DisneyMovie Music – Can You Feel The Love Tonight – Jim Brickman, piano

DisneyMovie Music – Can You Feel The Love Tonight – Jim Brickman, piano
Sheet Music book available in our Library:sheetmusiclibrary.website
(AUDIO only, as no Disney images can be displayed due to Copyright restrictions)

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Disney Movie Music

Disney Music – Beauty And The Beast

Disney Music – Beauty And The Beast – Jim Brickman, piano with sheet music

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Disney Movie Music

Disney Music – A Dream Is A Wish Your Heart Makes – Jim Brickman, piano

“A Dream Is A Wish Your Heart Makes” is a song written and composed by Mack David, Al Hoffman and Jerry Livingston for the Walt Disney film Cinderella (1950). In the song, Cinderella (voiced by Ilene Woods) encourages her animal friends to never stop dreaming, and that theme continues throughout the entire story. The theme of the song was taken from Franz Liszt’s Etude No. 9 Ricordanza of the Transcendental Etudes.

Thematically, the lyrics recall the sentiments expressed in “When You Wish upon a Star” from Pinocchio (1940). In equating a dream with a wish, the song establishes that Cinderella is using the word “dream” in the metaphorical sense of desires that can, as the lyric promises, “come true.” “When You Wish Upon A Star” makes this same promise, as does other Disney material, such as the fireworks show Remember… Dreams Come True and related promotions. The literal meaning of the word, as something that happens “when you’re fast asleep”, reappears in another Disney song, “Once Upon a Dream” from Sleeping Beauty (1959).