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Disney Movie Music

Cruella De Vil (Disney) Jim Brickman, piano

Cruella De Vil (Disney) — Jim Brickman, piano solo with sheet music

One Hundred and One Dalmatians is a 1961 American animated adventure film produced by Walt Disney Productions and based on the 1956 novel The Hundred and One Dalmatians by Dodie Smith. Directed by Clyde Geronimi, Hamilton Luske, and Wolfgang Reitherman, it was Disney’s 17th animated feature film. The film tells the story of a litter of Dalmatian puppies who are kidnapped by the villainous Cruella de Vil (“deVille”), who wants to use their fur to make into coats. Their parents, Pongo and Perdita, set out to save their children from Cruella, in the process rescuing 84 additional puppies that were bought in pet shops, bringing the total of Dalmatians to 101.

The film was originally released to theaters on January 25, 1961, by Buena Vista Distribution, and was a box office success, pulling the studio out of the financial slump caused by Sleeping Beauty, a costlier production released two years prior. Aside from its box office revenue, its commercial success was due to the employment of inexpensive animation techniques—such as using xerography during the process of inking and painting traditional animation cels—that kept production costs down. Disney released the live-action adaptation 101 Dalmatians in 1996 and a sequel, 102 Dalmatians in 2000, a direct to video animated sequel 101 Dalmatians II: Patch’s London Adventure in 2003 and a live-action spin-off/prequel called Cruella directed by Craig Gillespie is scheduled to be released on May 28, 2021.

In order to have music involved in the narrative, Peet used an old theater trick by which the protagonist is a down-and-out songwriter. However, unlike the previous animated Disney films at the time, the songs were not composed by a team, but by Mel Leven who composed both lyrics and music.[10] Previously, Leven had composed songs for the UPA animation studio in which animators, who transferred to work at Disney, had recommended him to Walt. His first assignment was to compose “Cruella de Vil”, of which Leven composed three versions. The final version used in the film was composed as a “bluesy number” prior to a meeting with Walt in forty-five minutes.

The other two songs included in the film are “Kanine Krunchies Jingle” (sung by Lucille Bliss, who voiced Anastasia Tremaine in Disney’s 1950 film Cinderella), and “Dalmatian Plantation” in which only two lines are sung by Roger at its closure. Leven had also written additional songs that were not included in the film. The first song, “Don’t Buy a Parrot from a Sailor”, a cockney chant, was meant to be sung by Jasper and Horace at the De Vil Mansion. A second song, “Cheerio, Good-Bye, Toodle-oo, Hip Hip!” was to be sung by the dalmatian puppies as they make their way into London. A third song titled “March of the One Hundred and One” was meant for the dogs to sing after escaping Cruella by van. Different, longer versions of “Kanine Krunchies Jingle” and “Dalmatian Plantation” appear on the Disneyland Records read-along album based on the film.

Categories
Disney Movie Music

Disney – Mary Poppins Medley – Jim Brickman, piano (with sheet music)

Disney – Mary Poppins Medley – Jim Brickman, piano (with sheet music)

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Disney Movie Music

Disney – Someday My Prince Will Come – Jim Brickman, piano

Disney – Someday My Prince Will Come – Jim Brickman, piano

Sheet Music book available in our Library:
sheetmusiclibrary.website

(AUDIO only, as no Disney images can be displayed due to Copyright restrictions)

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Disney Movie Music

DisneyMovie Music – Can You Feel The Love Tonight – Jim Brickman, piano

DisneyMovie Music – Can You Feel The Love Tonight – Jim Brickman, piano
Sheet Music book available in our Library:sheetmusiclibrary.website
(AUDIO only, as no Disney images can be displayed due to Copyright restrictions)

Categories
Disney Movie Music

Disney Music – Beauty And The Beast

Disney Music – Beauty And The Beast – Jim Brickman, piano with sheet music

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Disney Movie Music

Disney Music – A Dream Is A Wish Your Heart Makes – Jim Brickman, piano

“A Dream Is A Wish Your Heart Makes” is a song written and composed by Mack David, Al Hoffman and Jerry Livingston for the Walt Disney film Cinderella (1950). In the song, Cinderella (voiced by Ilene Woods) encourages her animal friends to never stop dreaming, and that theme continues throughout the entire story. The theme of the song was taken from Franz Liszt’s Etude No. 9 Ricordanza of the Transcendental Etudes.

Thematically, the lyrics recall the sentiments expressed in “When You Wish upon a Star” from Pinocchio (1940). In equating a dream with a wish, the song establishes that Cinderella is using the word “dream” in the metaphorical sense of desires that can, as the lyric promises, “come true.” “When You Wish Upon A Star” makes this same promise, as does other Disney material, such as the fireworks show Remember… Dreams Come True and related promotions. The literal meaning of the word, as something that happens “when you’re fast asleep”, reappears in another Disney song, “Once Upon a Dream” from Sleeping Beauty (1959).