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Gershwin at the piano

George Gershwin at the Piano ‘s wonderful

“‘S Wonderful, ‘S Marvelous” redirects here. For the Gilmore Girls episode, see List of Gilmore Girls episodes § Season 7 (2006–07). For the 1956 album by Ray Conniff, see ‘S Wonderful (album).

‘S Wonderful” is a 1927 popular song composed by George Gershwin, with lyrics written by Ira Gershwin. It was introduced in the Broadway musical Funny Face (1927) by Adele Astaire and Allen Kearns.

The song is considered a standard and has been recorded by many artists, especially jazz artists. In 1928, Adele Astaire, who introduced the song on stage the previous year, recorded one of the earliest versions with Bernard Clifton. The most successful recordings in 1928 were however by Frank Crumit and by the Ipana Troubadors.

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Gershwin at the piano

George Gershwin at the Piano – I got rhythm (with sheet music)

https://youtu.be/wHfUUnAU6VM

Published 1930 by George and Ira Gerhswin.  “I Got Rhythm” is a piece composed by George Gershwin with lyrics by Ira Gershwin and published in 1930, which became a jazz standard. Its chord progression, known as the “rhythm changes”, is the foundation for many other popular jazz tunes such as Charlie Parker’s and Dizzy Gillespie’s bebop standard “Anthropology (Thrivin’ on a Riff)”. The song came from the musical Girl Crazy which also includes two other hit songs, “Embraceable You” and “But Not for Me”, and has been sung by many jazz singers since. It was originally written as a slow song for Treasure Girl (1928) and found another, faster setting in Girl Crazy. Ethel Merman sang the song in the original Broadway production and Broadway lore holds that George Gershwin, after seeing her opening reviews, warned her never to take a singing lesson. The song was included in the Gershwin brothers’ 1931 Broadway musical. Of Thee I Sing. An instrumental arrangement for piano and orchestra appears in the 1945 Hollywood Victory Caravan. The song is featured in the 1951 musical film An American in Paris. Gene Kelly sang the song and tap-danced, while French-speaking children whom he had just taught a few words of English shouted the words “I got” each time they appeared in the lyrics. This version finished at #32 in AFI’s 100 Years…100 Songs survey of top tunes in American cinema.