Categories
Jazz & Blues Music

When I fall in love – Bill Evans Jazz trio (with sheet music transcription)

When I fall in love – Bill Evans Jazz trio (with sheet music transcription). Download this and many more Jazz transcriptions from our Sheet Music Library.

sheet music transcfription free sheet music & pdf scores download

When I fall in love – Bill Evans Jazz trio (with sheet music transcription) Download this and many more Jazz transcriptions from our Sheet Music Library: https://sheetmusiclibrary.website/jaz… Bill Evans, William John Evans (August 16, 1929 – September 15, 1980) was an American jazz pianist and composer who mostly played in trios. His use of impressionist harmony, inventive interpretation of traditional jazz repertoire, block chords, and trademark rhythmically independent, “singing” melodic lines continue to influence jazz pianists today.

Born in Plainfield, New Jersey, in 1929, he was classically trained at Southeastern Louisiana University and the Mannes School of Music, where he majored in composition and received the Artist Diploma. In 1955, he moved to New York City, where he worked with bandleader and theorist George Russell. In 1958, Evans joined Miles Davis’s sextet, which in 1959, then immersed in modal jazz, recorded Kind of Blue, the best-selling jazz album of all time. ———————————————————————————————————————– “When I Fall in Love” is a popular song, written by Victor Young (music) and Edward Heyman (lyrics). It was introduced in the film One Minute to Zero. Jeri Southern sang on the first recording released in April 1952 with the song’s composer, Victor Young, handling the arranging and conducting duties.

The song has become a standard, with many artists recording it; the first hit version was sung by Doris Day released in July 1952. Day’s recording was made on June 5, 1952. It was released by Columbia Records as catalog number 39786 and issued with the flip side “Take Me in Your Arms”. The song reached number 20 on the Billboard chart.[1] A 1996 cover by Natalie Cole, a “duet” with her father Nat King Cole by way of vocals from his 1956 cover, won 1996 Grammys for Best Pop Collaboration with Vocals and Best Instrumental Arrangement with Accompanying Vocal(s).

Search Posts by Categories:

and subscribe to our social channels for news and music updates:

Categories
Jazz & Blues Music

Chet Baker and Bill Evans “How high the Moon” (track nr. 2)

The Complete Legendary Sessions

Chet Baker and Bill Evans – “How high the Moon” with sheet music download

free sheet music & scores pdf Chet Baker and Bill Evans - "How high the Moon"

Lyrics

Somewhere there’s music
How faint the tune
Somewhere there’s heaven
How high the moon
There is no moon above
Love is far away too
‘Til it comes true
That you love me as I love youSomewhere there’s music
How near, how far
Somewhere there’s heaven
It’s where you are
The darkest night would shine
If you would come to me soon
Until you will, how still my heart
How high the moonAah-aah-aah-aah-aah-aah-aah-aah-aahSomewhere there’s music
How faint the tune
Somewhere there’s heaven
How high the moon
The darkest night would shine
If you would come to me soon
Until you will, how still my heart
How high the moon

How High the Moon” is a jazz standard with lyrics by Nancy Hamilton and music by Morgan Lewis. It was first featured in the 1940 Broadway revue Two for the Show, where it was sung by Alfred Drake and Frances Comstock. In Two for the Show, this was a rare serious moment in an otherwise humorous revue.

Chet Baker & Bill Evans: a short Biography

Never have two musicians seemed so alike in temperament yet differed so much in their approach to making music as Chet Baker and Bill Evans. While both were peerless masters of their instruments and shared a rich, evocatively lyrical playing style that bordered beguilingly on the introspective, Baker and Evans were polar opposites when it came to the discipline of performance.

Though both were heroin addicts, the musically-trained Evans never let it interfere with his meticulously precise flights of invention while the self-taught Baker became increasingly erratic and inconsistent. They ventured into a recording studio together on just three occasions, with largely disappointing results, their potentially combustible collaboration failing to ignite and all too frequently sounding workmanlike and uninspiring.

The Complete Legendary Sessions corrals the 15 tracks that resulted from those sessions – previously issued on two 1959 albums: Chet, and Chet Baker Plays the Best of Lerner and Loewe – together for the first time, with a vocals-free Baker concentrating on his horn playing.

Occupying the first 10 tracks (absent from the LP release, Early Morning Mood appears here as a welcome bookend) Chet turns in satisfyingly laidback but unexciting performances. Sparks of energy are provided by Herbie Mann’s flute, the baritone sax of Pepper Adams, Connie Kay and Philly Joe Jones on percussion, guitarist Kenny Burrell and bass man Paul Chambers, who all go about their business with a winningly insouciant confidence.

Album opener Alone Together continues to cast a shimmering, dark-hued spell half a century later, Baker breathing long, lingering, hypnotic lines that flex and flow with understated panache. The prevailing mood is melancholic and down-tempo, with the virtually somnambulant Baker and overly cautious Evans remaining curiously semi-detached from each other throughout.

The Lerner and Loewe material offers livelier fare, but Baker remains strangely subdued and understatement continues to be Evans’s default even in the love-lit delirium of I Could Have Danced All Night. A bonus cover of Almost Like Being in Love sways rather than swings, with Bob Corwin stepping in for Evans.

As a glimpse of what might have been had these two been on form, this tantalises and frustrates in equal measure.

Songs based on “How High the Moon”

Another jazz standard, “Ornithology” by Charlie Parker, is based on the chords of “How High the Moon”. It was common among jazz musicians (Ella Fitzgerald, Lionel Hampton and others) to seamlessly include “Ornithology” in the solo when performing “How High the Moon”. Lennie Tristano wrote the contrafact “Lennie-bird” over the chord changes, and Miles Davis/Chuck Wayne‘s “Solar” is also based on part of the chord structure. Coleman Hawkins’ tune “Bean At Met” is also based on the changes of How High The Moon; this tune starts with simple riffs on the measures 1 to 8 and 17 to 24. The rest is filled up with solos.

John Coltrane‘s composition “Satellite” is also based on the chords of “How High the Moon”, which Coltrane embellished with the three-tonic progression he also used on his composition “Giant Steps“.

Jimmy Giuffre‘s composition “Bright Moon” is also based on the chords of “How High the Moon”. Quincy Jones recorded it in 1957 on his second album, Go West, Man!

The Complete Legendary Sessions (Chet Baker & Bill Evans)

Never have two musicians seemed so alike in temperament yet differed so much in their approach to making music as Chet Baker and Bill Evans. While both were peerless masters of their instruments and shared a rich, evocatively lyrical playing style that bordered beguilingly on the introspective, Baker and Evans were polar opposites when it came to the discipline of performance.


Though both were heroin addicts, the musically-trained Evans never let it interfere with his meticulously precise flights of invention while the self-taught Baker became increasingly erratic and inconsistent. They ventured into a recording studio together on just three occasions, with largely disappointing results, their potentially combustible collaboration failing to ignite and all too frequently sounding workmanlike and uninspiring.

The Complete Legendary Sessions corrals the 15 tracks that resulted from those sessions – previously issued on two 1959 albums: Chet, and Chet Baker Plays the Best of Lerner and Loewe – together for the first time, with a vocals-free Baker concentrating on his horn playing.


Occupying the first 10 tracks (absent from the LP release, Early Morning Mood appears here as a welcome bookend) Chet turns in satisfyingly laidback but unexciting performances. Sparks of energy are provided by Herbie Mann’s flute, the baritone sax of Pepper Adams, Connie Kay and Philly Joe Jones on percussion, guitarist Kenny Burrell and bass man Paul Chambers, who all go about their business with a winningly insouciant confidence.


Album opener Alone Together continues to cast a shimmering, dark-hued spell half a century later, Baker breathing long, lingering, hypnotic lines that flex and flow with understated panache. The prevailing mood is melancholic and down-tempo, with the virtually somnambulant Baker and overly cautious Evans remaining curiously semi-detached from each other throughout.


The Lerner and Loewe material offers livelier fare, but Baker remains strangely subdued and understatement continues to be Evans’s default even in the love-lit delirium of I Could Have Danced All Night. A bonus cover of Almost Like Being in Love sways rather than swings, with Bob Corwin stepping in for Evans.


As a glimpse of what might have been had these two been on form, this tantalises and frustrates in equal measure. Version 1, edited by VaMpkt on 8 April 2011, 1:24pm · View version history

bill evans sheet music
Categories
Jazz & Blues Music

Bill Evans – Danny Boy, by Frederic Weatherly (Bill Evans Jazz version)

Bill Evans – Danny Boy, by Frederic Weatherly (Bill Evans Jazz version) with sheet music

“Danny Boy” is a ballad, written by English songwriter Frederic Weatherly in 1913, and set to the traditional Irish melody of “Londonderry Air”.
In 1910, in Bath, Somerset, the English lawyer and lyricist Frederic Weatherly initially wrote the words to “Danny Boy” to a tune other than “Londonderry Air”. After his Irish-born sister-in-law Margaret Enright Weatherly (known as Jess) in the United States sent him a copy of “Londonderry Air” in 1913 (an alternative version of the story has her singing the air to him in 1912 with different lyrics), Weatherly modified the lyrics of “Danny Boy” to fit the rhyme and meter of “Londonderry Air”.

Weatherly gave the song to the vocalist Elsie Griffin, who made it one of the most popular songs in the new century. In 1915, Ernestine Schumann-Heink produced the first recording of “Danny Boy”.

Jane Ross of Limavady is credited with collecting the melody of “Londonderry Air” in the mid-19th century from a musician she encountered.

The 1913 lyrics by Frederick E. Weatherly:

Oh, Danny boy, the pipes, the pipes are calling
From glen to glen, and down the mountain side.
The summer’s gone, and all the roses falling,
It’s you, It’s you must go and I must bide.
But come ye back when summer’s in the meadow,
Or when the valley’s hushed and white with snow,
It’s I’ll be here in sunshine or in shadow,—
Oh, Danny boy, O Danny boy, I love you so!

But when ye come, and all the flowers are dying,
If I am dead, as dead I well may be,
Ye’ll come and find the place where I am lying,
And kneel and say an Avè there for me.
And I shall hear, though soft you tread above me,
And all my grave will warmer, sweeter be,
For you will bend and tell me that you love me,
And I shall sleep in peace until you come to me!

Various suggestions exist as to the true meaning of “Danny Boy”. Some have interpreted the song to be a message from a parent to a son going off to a war or uprising (as suggested by the reference to “pipes calling glen to glen”) or leaving as part of the Irish diaspora.

The 1918 version of the sheet music with Weatherly’s printed signature included alternative lyrics (“Eily Dear”), with the instructions that “when sung by a man, the words in italic should be used; the song then becomes “Eily Dear”, so that “Danny Boy” is only to be sung by a lady”. In spite of this, it is unclear whether this was Weatherly’s intent. The song has been performed by a diverse range of male singers, including Irish tenor John McCormack, Jim Reeves, Mario Lanza, Bing Crosby, Andy Williams, Eric Clapton, Johnny Cash, Sam Cooke, Elvis Presley, Shane MacGowan, Jackie Wilson, Daniel O’Donnell, Harry Belafonte, Tom Jones, John Gary, Frank Patterson, Thomas Quasthoff, Stuart Burrows, Jacob Collier, Harry Connick Jr., and comedian Peter Kay amongst many others. All used the original lyrics with slight variations.

The song is popular for funerals; but, as it is not liturgical, its suitability as a funeral song is sometimes contested. In 1928, Weatherly himself suggested that the second verse would provide a fitting requiem for the actress Ellen Terry.

But perhaps the greatest mystery about “Danny Boy” is its meaning. Who is Danny? Who’s singing to him, and why must he leave? Why will he and the narrator likely never see each other again? 

This ambiguity, this very universal lament about separation and the finality of death, and the greater power of love, has spoken to people of many nationalities and faiths, and to artists and singers from nearly every genre of music.

From John McCormack to Bill Evans, to the Mormon Tabernacle Choir, Johnny Cash, Elvis, Joan Baez, Patti LaBelle and innumerable others, “Danny Boy” expresses what Weatherly knew: that unlike the deepest philosophy, history, or sermon, “song and story appeal to the heart. From the heart they come and to the heart they must go.”

bill evans free sheet music & pdf scores download
Categories
Jazz & Blues Music

Bill Evans – Blue in Green (sheet music transcription)

Bill Evans – Blue in Green (sheet music transcription)

Search Post by Categories

bill evans free sheet music & pdf scores download

Subscribe & download the best scores and sheet music transcriptions
from our Library.

The Sheet Music Library (PDF) is a non-profit project dedicated
to the divulgation and education of music.
Please, visit: https://sheetmusiclibrary.website/
and, if you like it, subscribe. Thanks for your support!

Search Posts by Categories:

and subscribe to our social channels for news and music updates:

Categories
Did you know?

Bill Evans (1929-1980), american jazz pianist and composer, Solo Sessions I-II (with sheet music to download)

Bill Evans (1929-1980), american jazz pianist and composer, Solo Sessions I-II Download the sheet music transcriptions here.

Bill Evans, William John Evans (August 16, 1929 – September 15, 1980) was an American jazz pianist and composer who mostly played in trios. His use of impressionist harmony, inventive interpretation of traditional jazz repertoire, block chords, and trademark rhythmically independent, “singing” melodic lines continue to influence jazz pianists today.
amercian jazz pianist and composer Bill Evans sheet music transcriptions
Born in Plainfield, New Jersey, in 1929, he was classically trained at Southeastern Louisiana University and the Mannes School of Music, where he majored in composition and received the Artist Diploma. In 1955, he moved to New York City, where he worked with bandleader and theorist George Russell. In 1958, Evans joined Miles Davis’s sextet, which in 1959, then immersed in modal jazz, recorded Kind of Blue, the best-selling jazz album of all time. During that time, Evans was also playing with Chet Baker for the album Chet.
In late 1959, Evans left the Miles Davis band and began his career as a leader, with bassist Scott LaFaro and drummer Paul Motian, a group now regarded as a seminal modern jazz trio. In 1961, ten days after finishing an engagement at the New York Village Vanguard jazz club, LaFaro died in a car accident.
After months of seclusion, Evans re-emerged with a new trio, featuring bassist Chuck Israels. In 1963, Evans recorded Conversations with Myself, a solo album using the unconventional technique of overdubbing over himself. In 1966, he met bassist Eddie Gómez, with whom he would work for eleven years. Many of Evans’s compositions, such as “Waltz for Debby”, have become standards, played and recorded by many artists.
Evans was honored with 31 Grammy nominations and seven awards, and was inducted into the Down Beat Jazz Hall of Fame.
Bill Evans american pianist and composer jazz transcription sheet music

The Solo Sessions, Vol. 1 is an album by jazz pianist Bill Evans, released in 1989. Evans recorded The Solo Sessions, Vol. 1 and Vol. 2 at the same session, on January 10, 1963 and the tracks were originally released as part of Bill Evans: The Complete Riverside Recordings in 1984. The Bill Evans Memorial Library states these sessions were never intended for release. The Solo Sessions, Vol. 2 is an album by jazz pianist Bill Evans, released in 1992. Evans recorded The Solo Sessions, Vol. 1 and Vol. 2 at the same session, on January 10, 1963. The Bill Evans Memorial Library states these sessions were never intended for release. Personnel: Bill Evans (p) Released: 1989, 1992 Recorded: January 24, 1963 Label: Milestone M-9170, MCD 9195-2 Producer: Orrin Keepnews

Vol I: 0:00 “What Kind of Fool Am I?” [Take 1] (Bricusse, Newley) 6:17 “Medley: My Favorite Things/Easy to Love/Baubles, Bangles, & Beads” (Borodin, Wright, Forrest) 18:51 “When I Fall in Love” (Heyman, Young) 21:52 “Medley: Spartacus Love Theme/Nardis” (Alex North) 30:27 “Everything Happens to Me” (Adair, Dennis) 36:15 “April in Paris” (Duke, E. Y. Harburg) Vol II: 42:06 “All the Things You Are” (Hammerstein II, Kern) 51:14 “Santa Claus Is Coming to Town” (Coots, Gillespie) 55:53 “I Loves You Porgy” (Gershwin, Gershwin, Heyward) 1:01:44 “What Kind of Fool Am I?” [Take 2] (Bricusse, Newley) 1:08:31 “Love Is Here to Stay” (Gershwin, Gershwin) 1:12:33 “Ornithology” (Harris, Parker) 1:18:08 “Medley: Autumn in New York/How About You?” (Duke, Freed, Lane) You can find many Bill Evans solo transcriptions and compositions sheet music in our open Library, including the great analysis book “The Harmony of Bill Evans”, by Jack Reilly.

Categories
Jazz & Blues Music LIVE Music Concerts

Bill Evans – Live in Switzerland (1975 Album)

Bill Evans – Live in Switzerland (1975 Album)

Bill Evans – Live in Switzerland (1975 Album)

Search Post by Categories

This LP comes from a live 1975 concert by the Bill Evans Trio, which was broadcast by Radio Suisse in Switzerland. The pianist is in superb form, joined by longtime bassist Eddie Gomez and newcomer Eliot Zigmund on drums. The sound is excellent, without the annoying announcers or distortion, so this release could have very well been produced from the master tape itself. The set is wide-ranging, including both recent and older compositions by Evans, “Gloria’s Step” (the best-known work by former Evans sideman Scott LaFaro, who died far too young), along with standards like a buoyant “My Romance.

” The leader’s treatment of his ballad “Turn Out the Stars” is rather upbeat, while his somewhat avant-garde composition “T.T.T.T.” (also known as “Twelve Tone Tune Two”) is a modern masterpiece. Perhaps the greatest surprise was Evans‘ inventive treatment of pop singer Bobbie Gentry‘s “Morning Glory.”

bill evans free sheet music & pdf scores download

This CD comes from a live 1975 concert by the Bill Evans Trio, which was broadcast by Radio Suisse in Switzerland. The pianist is in superb form, joined by longtime bassist Eddie Gomez and newcomer Eliot Zigmund on drums.

The sound is excellent, without the annoying announcers or distortion, so this release could have very well been produced from the master tape itself. The set is wide-ranging, including both recent and older compositions by Evans, “Gloria’s Step” (the best known work by former Evans sideman Scott LaFaro, who died far too young), along with standards like a buoyant “My Romance.” The leader’s treatment of his ballad “Turn Out the Stars” is rather upbeat, while his somewhat avant-garde composition “T.T.T.T.” (also known as “Twelve Tone Tune Two”) is a modern masterpiece. Perhaps the greatest surprise was Evans’ inventive treatment of pop singer Bobbie Gentry’s “Morning Glory.”

The only real problem with this CD is the sloppy composer credits on two numbers. This 1990 release may be somewhat difficult to find, but it is one of the better bootlegs issued under Bill Evans’ name. — Ken Dryden, Rovi.

01 Sugar Plum 07:27
02 Midnight Mood 08:23
03 Turn Out The Stars 04:56
04 Gloria's Step 07:09
05 Up With The Lark 06:19
06 Twelve Toned Tune 07:10
07 Morning Glory 04:25
08 Sareen Jurer 06:59
09 Time Remembered 05:38
10 My Romance 07:54
11 Waltz For Debby 05:58
12 Yesterday I Heard The Rain 05:42

Bill Evans, piano
Eddie Gomez, bass
Eliot Zigmund, drums

Epalinges, Switzerland, 6th February 1975
sheet music pdf

Bill Evans was on an upswing in 1968. There had been tragedy and depression and demons to bear, but the jazz pianist had made his way forward over the previous few years. He had collaborated fruitfully with such peers as Jim Hall, gained a devoted new manager, signed with the high-profile Verve label, and won his first Grammy Award. Evans had also developed rapport with a virtuoso young bassist, Eddie Gomez, and they eventually added an up-and-coming force of a drummer, Jack DeJohnette, for a new trio — one that seemed to hold a dynamic promise that the pianist’s groups hadn’t quite shown since his famously inspired trio with drummer Paul Motian and short-lived bassist Scott LaFaro in 1959–61.

A European tour by Evans, Gomez, and DeJohnette in the summer of ’68 would yield an ebullient live album, At the Montreux Jazz Festival, that garnered the pianist his second Grammy. Then Miles Davis broke up the band.

That is, Davis lured DeJohnette away to his own group. Evans could scarcely blame the drummer for leaving him to join the era’s most iconic jazz bandleader. After all, the pianist had made his own name as the trumpeter’s kindred-spirit collaborator on Kind of Blue, the LP that would turn on more people to jazz than any in music history. (DeJohnette would end up playing on Davis’s Bitches Brew, an album almost as epochal for the late sixties as Kind of Blue was for the late fifties.)

But it seemed like a missed opportunity, as the Evans trio with DeJohnette and Gomez, having been together for just six months, was only able to make that one live recording, nothing in the studio. Or at least that’s the way the story went until 2016, when Resonance Records released Some Other Time: The Lost Session from the Black Forest, a two-disc set derived from impromptu recordings made by the trio in a German studio just five days after that celebrated Montreux concert.

For reasons not quite clear, the recordings had never been issued before Resonance’s sleuthing. But all’s well that ends well, at least for today’s Bill Evans fans.

Then lightning struck twice. Last year, Resonance followed up Some Other Time by releasing a second, contemporaneous discovery: Another Time: The Hilversum Concert, which presents a pristine recording of Evans, Gomez, and DeJohnette performing for an audience in the intimate hall of the Netherlands Radio Union, just two days after that studio session in Germany. Moreover, the set list for that Dutch broadcast recording only features two numbers in common with the Montreux concert from the week before. Suddenly, we have two valuable “new” albums — recordings never even bootlegged before — by one of the most beloved and widely influential pianists in the annals of jazz.

“Bill Evans has shaped the harmony of every jazz pianist of the past fifty years, whether they want to admit it or not — because even if they didn’t listen to Bill, they listened to players who did listen to him, from Herbie Hancock on down,” says ace jazz pianist Frank Kimbrough, who teaches at the Juilliard School. “And for the public, the beauty of his music, particularly his early work, has always been accessible — easy to listen to, even if it isn’t ‘easy listening.’”

Download Bill Evans’ transcriptions sheet music from our online Library.