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Film Music

The World Of Hans Zimmer – A Symphonic Celebration (Full Album)

The World Of Hans Zimmer – A Symphonic Celebration (Full Album). Download Hans Zimmer’s sheet music from our Library.

sheet music pdf
sheet music pdf The World Of Hans Zimmer - A Symphonic Celebration (Full Album)

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Did you know?

Recently (June 2019) added new sheet music to our Library:

Recently (June 2019) added new sheet music to our Library

Categories
Did you know?

Why Your Library Needs Music. An interesting article.

A growing body of research is affirming the central role of music in early literacy. Librarians are listening—and designing programs with a deep mindfulness of how music supports PreK–learning. Music has been proven to do everything from boosting numeracy to developing empathy among children; from improving speech-language delays to augmenting comprehension. One study from the Music-Science Lab at the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev showed that young children who played hand-clapping games had better cognitive and social skills than those who didn’t.

For librarians, engaging babies and children during 45 minutes of storytime or family sing-along is just part of the job. While making the most of rhyming tunes, props, and the “fun, fun, fun!” factor, as Minnesota children’s librarian Anna Haase Krueger says, librarians also educate parents about music’s importance. A founding principle of the child-adult music program Music Together, created in 1987, is that participation and modeling by adults are critical to children’s musical development.

Why Your Library Needs Music free sheet music & pdf scores download

While many parents crave the bonding and social aspects of these activities, understanding the latest research makes shaking those egg rattles a richer experience. Librarians help them learn—and encourage them to bring the beat home, or in the car, or on the bus.

The library-parent education initiatives Every Child Ready to Read (ECRR) and Every Child Ready to Read 2 (ECRR2) influence many a storytime across the country. “The whole purpose of ECRR is to inform parents about what they can do” at home to prepare kids for school readiness, says Starr LaTronica, past president of the Association for Library Service to Children, which created ECRR kits for youth librarians in partnership with the Public Library Association. “Songs introduce words that they might not encounter somewhere else.”

ECRR, issued in 2004, identified six key skills that support preliteracy, such as print motivation, phonological awareness, and narrative skills. The idea is that encouraging these skills at home will reinforce libraries’ efforts. The revised ECRR2 (2011) uses terms that parents can grasp more easily to encourage these habits, swapping the six skills with five simpler “practices:” sing, talk, read, write, and play. However librarians convey this information, it’s critical for parents to keep up these habits at home. Attending storytime once a week isn’t enough to build preliteracy skills, according to ECRR research.

Why Your Library Needs Music free sheet music & pdf scores download

Where do librarians find music resources to encourage all of this educational fun? From “the hundreds of storytime blogs I follow,” says Kendra Jones, a children’s librarian at the Vancouver (WA) Community Library (VCL), and many follow suit. Sites such as Storytime Underground, where Jones serves as a joint chief, give librarians a forum for posting questions and sharing knowledge and best practices. These free resources, along with social media, professional networks, and storytime songs posted on YouTube and Vimeo, spark creativity and offer a community for librarians who often work in relative isolation.

While many libraries don’t have extensive physical music collections, some make use of library music downloading services such as Freegal. During live programming, many say, old chestnuts, such as “Five Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed” and “The Wheels on the Bus,” which pair singing with movement, never go out of style.

https://freesheetmusiclibrary.blogspot.com/20s19/06/why-your-library-needs-music.html

Categories
Film Music

Howl’s Moving Castle – Merry go round of Life cover

Howl’s Moving Castle – Merry go round of Life cover by Grissini Project with sheet music

Piano arrangement sheet music available in our Library.

Howl's Moving Castle Piano arrangement sheet music sheet music

Howl’s Moving Castle Joe Hisaishi soundtrack Merry Gor Round of Life, live performance by Grissini Project with Curieux orchestra.

– Grissini Project

Piano solo : Romain Vaudé Violin solo : Bastien Vidal Cello solo : Valentin Catil –

Orchestre Curieux

– Conductor : Daniel Sicard 1st violins : Celio Torina Mariane Minjou Margot Flour Hugo Tiberghien Lydie Souppaya Meiou Wang 2nd violons : Fabian Ishibashi Pauline Gillet Marie Lestrelin Nicolas Simon Margaux Dauby Violas : Oriane Lavignolle David Heusler Lauréline Didier René Tambour Cellos : Paul-Marie Kuzma Moïse Langlet Camille Sicard Rachel Fromy Markovich Contrebass : Lilas Berault Antoine Leiser Flute : Clarisse Deroin Christelle Raquillet Oboe : Coralie Menuge Chloé Riès Clarinet : Clara Lighezzolo Matthieu Gaillard Basson : Eugénie Loiseau Manon Leth French Horn : Elodie Baert Quentin Benoit Guillaume Renévot Trompets Mu Hu Rémi Pierrat Trombones : Dimitri Megherbi Drums : Milàn Tabak Percussions : Paul Riva Bastien Lafosse

Categories
Games' music

FINAL FANTASY VII OST PIANO SHEET MUSIC

Final Fantasy VII (and others!) piano sheet music is in our Library for free borrowing!

You can also read this intresting musical analysis.

sheet music partitura FINAL FANTASY VII

https://freesheetmusiclibrary.blogspot.com/2019/06/final-fantasy-vii-and-others-piano.html

Final Fantasy VII is a role-playing video game developed by Square (now Square Enix) and published by Sony Computer Entertainment as the seventh installment in the Final Fantasy series. Released in 1997, the game sparked the release of a collection of media centered on the game entitled the Compilation of Final Fantasy VII. The music of the Final Fantasy VII series includes not only the soundtrack to the original game and its associated albums, but also the soundtracks and music albums released for the other titles in the collection.

The first album produced was Final Fantasy VII Original Soundtrack, a compilation of all the music in the game. It was released as a soundtrack album on four CDs by DigiCube in 1997. A selection of tracks from the album was released in the single-disc Reunion Tracks by DigiCube the same year. Piano Collections Final Fantasy VII, an album featuring piano arrangements of pieces from the soundtrack, was released in 2003 by DigiCube, and Square Enix began reprinting all three albums in 2004. To date, these are the only released albums based on the original game’s soundtrack, and were solely composed by regular series composer Nobuo Uematsu; his role for the majority of subsequent albums has been filled by Masashi Hamauzu and Takeharu Ishimoto.

FINAL FANTASY VII sheet music pdf

The Compilation of Final Fantasy VII began eight years after the release of Final Fantasy VII with the release of the animated film sequel Advent Children in 2005. The soundtracks for each of the titles in the collection are included in an album, starting with the album release of the soundtrack to Advent Children that year. The following year, Nippon Crown released a soundtrack album to correspond with the video game Dirge of Cerberus, while Square Enix launched a download-only collection of music from the multiplayer mode of the game, which was only released in Japan. After the launch of the game Crisis Core in 2007, Warner Music Japan produced the title’s soundtrack.

The latest album in the collection, Before Crisis: Final Fantasy VII & Last Order: Final Fantasy VII Original Soundtrack, was released by Square Enix the same year as a combined soundtrack album for the game Before Crisis and the animated movie Last Order.

The original music received highly positive reviews from critics, who found many of the tunes to be memorable and noted the emotional intensity of several of the tracks. The reception for the other albums has been mixed, with reactions ranging from enthusiastic praise to disappointment. Several pieces from the soundtrack, particularly “One-Winged Angel” and “Aeris’ Theme”, remain popular and have been performed numerous times in orchestral concert series such as Dear Friends: Music from Final Fantasy and Tour de Japon: Music from Final Fantasy. Music from the Original Soundtrack has been included in arranged albums and compilations by Square as well as outside groups.

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Best Classical Music

F. Liszt – “Ständchen” Piano Transcriptions After Schubert – Khatia Buniatishvili

https://freesheetmusiclibrary.blogspot.com/2019/06/f-liszt-standchen-piano-transcriptions.html

F. Liszt – “Ständchen” Piano Transcriptions After Schubert – Khatia Buniatishvili

Categories
Best Classical Music

Yuja Wang plays Rachmaninov’s Piano Concerto No. 3

https://freesheetmusiclibrary.blogspot.com/019/06/yuja-wang-plays-rachmaninovs-piano.html

生平

1987年生於中国北京的一个音乐家庭,父亲王建国是打击乐演奏家,母亲翟杰明是舞蹈老师。她自六歲起習琴,后在中央音乐学院学习[1]。1999年,王羽佳作为晨间音乐桥国际音乐节的交流生来到加拿大卡加利皇家山学院,并随后就读于皇家山音乐学院,她於2001年獲首届仙台國際音樂大賽钢琴组季軍及評委會特別獎[2],2002年被美國柯蒂斯音樂學院录取,师从钢琴教育家加里·格拉夫曼

2003年王羽佳在瑞士蘇黎世舉行了歐洲首演,和指挥大卫·辛曼苏黎世音乐厅管弦乐团合作演奏了貝多芬第四鋼琴協奏曲》。2005年在加拿大渥太華,王羽佳受指挥平夏斯·祖克曼邀请,顶替臨時缺席的鋼琴家拉杜·鲁普,与加拿大国家艺术中心乐团合作完成她在北美的首次演出。

2005年9月11日,王羽佳獲得2006年吉爾默年輕藝術家大獎(Gilmore Young Artist Award)。該獎頒給二十三歲以下的優秀鋼琴家,獎金一萬五千美元。獲獎者可在吉爾默音樂節上演出,並會有作曲家專門為之創作一首作品。

2009年1月與德意志留声机公司(DG)簽下五張唱片的合約。同年4月20日推出的首張個人專輯《Sonatas & Etudes》獲提名第52屆格林美獎古典樂最佳器樂獨奏(無管弦樂伴奏)[3]。該專輯中收錄了炫技版的莫札特「土耳其進行曲」,是為亮點。

2010年在DG推出第二張個人專輯《Transformation》,收錄了史特拉汶斯基斯卡拉蒂布拉姆斯拉威爾等人作品。2011年在DG推出第三张个人专辑《Rachmaninov: Piano Concerto No. 2 / Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini》。2012年在DG推出第四张个人专辑《Fantasia》,收录了拉赫曼尼諾夫、斯卡拉蒂、舒伯特、蕭邦等人作品。

王羽佳现居紐約,但大部分時間均於全球各地巡迴演出。自2010年以来每年演出超过一百場,縱橫歐美、日本以及世界各地古典樂舞台,已然成為世界最頂尖鋼琴家之

王羽佳在新一代華人鋼琴家中以技巧高超著稱,演奏風格大氣而硬朗。她亦擁有與眾不同的性格,曾在其私人Facebook頁面上自稱「an egocentric, shameless prima donna…have the possibility of turning to a geisha」(自我中心、不知廉恥的傲嬌女王……有成為藝伎的潛質)。2010年5月30日在德國巴登-巴登演出結束後的記者會上,有人問「古典音樂家以外,誰對你影響最大?」王羽佳回答:「Lady Gaga

Categories
Jazz Music Music Concerts

Bill Evans – Live in Switzerland (1975 Album)

Bill Evans – Live in Switzerland (1975 Album)

This LP comes from a live 1975 concert by the Bill Evans Trio, which was broadcast by Radio Suisse in Switzerland. The pianist is in superb form, joined by longtime bassist Eddie Gomez and newcomer Eliot Zigmund on drums. The sound is excellent, without the annoying announcers or distortion, so this release could have very well been produced from the master tape itself. The set is wide-ranging, including both recent and older compositions by Evans, “Gloria’s Step” (the best-known work by former Evans sideman Scott LaFaro, who died far too young), along with standards like a buoyant “My Romance.” The leader’s treatment of his ballad “Turn Out the Stars” is rather upbeat, while his somewhat avant-garde composition “T.T.T.T.” (also known as “Twelve Tone Tune Two”) is a modern masterpiece. Perhaps the greatest surprise was Evans‘ inventive treatment of pop singer Bobbie Gentry‘s “Morning Glory.”

bill evans free sheet music & pdf scores download

This CD comes from a live 1975 concert by the Bill Evans Trio, which was broadcast by Radio Suisse in Switzerland. The pianist is in superb form, joined by longtime bassist Eddie Gomez and newcomer Eliot Zigmund on drums. The sound is excellent, without the annoying announcers or distortion, so this release could have very well been produced from the master tape itself. The set is wide-ranging, including both recent and older compositions by Evans, “Gloria’s Step” (the best known work by former Evans sideman Scott LaFaro, who died far too young), along with standards like a buoyant “My Romance.” The leader’s treatment of his ballad “Turn Out the Stars” is rather upbeat, while his somewhat avant-garde composition “T.T.T.T.” (also known as “Twelve Tone Tune Two”) is a modern masterpiece. Perhaps the greatest surprise was Evans’ inventive treatment of pop singer Bobbie Gentry’s “Morning Glory.” The only real problem with this CD is the sloppy composer credits on two numbers. This 1990 release may be somewhat difficult to find, but it is one of the better bootlegs issued under Bill Evans’ name. — Ken Dryden, Rovi.

01 Sugar Plum 07:27
02 Midnight Mood 08:23
03 Turn Out The Stars 04:56
04 Gloria's Step 07:09
05 Up With The Lark 06:19
06 Twelve Toned Tune 07:10
07 Morning Glory 04:25
08 Sareen Jurer 06:59
09 Time Remembered 05:38
10 My Romance 07:54
11 Waltz For Debby 05:58
12 Yesterday I Heard The Rain 05:42

Bill Evans, piano
Eddie Gomez, bass
Eliot Zigmund, drums

Epalinges, Switzerland, 6th February 1975
sheet music pdf

Bill Evans was on an upswing in 1968. There had been tragedy and depression and demons to bear, but the jazz pianist had made his way forward over the previous few years. He had collaborated fruitfully with such peers as Jim Hall, gained a devoted new manager, signed with the high-profile Verve label, and won his first Grammy Award. Evans had also developed rapport with a virtuoso young bassist, Eddie Gomez, and they eventually added an up-and-coming force of a drummer, Jack DeJohnette, for a new trio — one that seemed to hold a dynamic promise that the pianist’s groups hadn’t quite shown since his famously inspired trio with drummer Paul Motian and short-lived bassist Scott LaFaro in 1959–61. A European tour by Evans, Gomez, and DeJohnette in the summer of ’68 would yield an ebullient live album, At the Montreux Jazz Festival, that garnered the pianist his second Grammy. Then Miles Davis broke up the band.

That is, Davis lured DeJohnette away to his own group. Evans could scarcely blame the drummer for leaving him to join the era’s most iconic jazz bandleader. After all, the pianist had made his own name as the trumpeter’s kindred-spirit collaborator on Kind of Blue, the LP that would turn on more people to jazz than any in music history. (DeJohnette would end up playing on Davis’s Bitches Brew, an album almost as epochal for the late sixties as Kind of Blue was for the late fifties.) But it seemed like a missed opportunity, as the Evans trio with DeJohnette and Gomez, having been together for just six months, was only able to make that one live recording, nothing in the studio. Or at least that’s the way the story went until 2016, when Resonance Records released Some Other Time: The Lost Session from the Black Forest, a two-disc set derived from impromptu recordings made by the trio in a German studio just five days after that celebrated Montreux concert. For reasons not quite clear, the recordings had never been issued before Resonance’s sleuthing. But all’s well that ends well, at least for today’s Bill Evans fans.

Then lightning struck twice. Last year, Resonance followed up Some Other Time by releasing a second, contemporaneous discovery: Another Time: The Hilversum Concert, which presents a pristine recording of Evans, Gomez, and DeJohnette performing for an audience in the intimate hall of the Netherlands Radio Union, just two days after that studio session in Germany. Moreover, the set list for that Dutch broadcast recording only features two numbers in common with the Montreux concert from the week before. Suddenly, we have two valuable “new” albums — recordings never even bootlegged before — by one of the most beloved and widely influential pianists in the annals of jazz.

“Bill Evans has shaped the harmony of every jazz pianist of the past fifty years, whether they want to admit it or not — because even if they didn’t listen to Bill, they listened to players who did listen to him, from Herbie Hancock on down,” says ace jazz pianist Frank Kimbrough, who teaches at the Juilliard School. “And for the public, the beauty of his music, particularly his early work, has always been accessible — easy to listen to, even if it isn’t ‘easy listening.’”

Download Bill Evans’ transcriptions sheet music from out online Library.

Categories
Best Classical Music

Do you know who AMY BEACH was?

https://freesheetmusiclibrary.blogspot.com/2019/06/do-you-know-who-amy-beach-was.html

Amy Marcy Cheney Beach (September 5, 1867 – December 27, 1944) was an American composer and pianist. She was the first successful American female composer of large-scale art music. Her “Gaelic” Symphony, premiered by the Boston Symphony Orchestra in 1896, was the first symphony composed and published by an American woman. She was one of the first American composers to succeed without the benefit of European training, and one of the most respected and acclaimed American composers of her era. As a pianist, she was acclaimed for concerts she gave featuring her own music in the United States and in Germany. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (full biography and compositions here)

sheet music

You can listen to this romantic pieces (4 Sketches, Op.15, no. 3), here. And very soon the Sheet Music Library will include this tender romantic composition.

Categories
Best Classical Music

FREDERIC MOMPOU (CATALAN COMPOSER AND PIANIST) with sheet music to download

https://freesheetmusiclibrary.blogspot.com/2019/06/frederic-mompou-catalan-composer-and.html

FREDERIC MOMPOU and his sheet music

Mompou was a Catalan composer of lyric songs and piano miniatures whose music is characterized by Impressionist elegance, simple and direct melody, and the haunting, deep emotions of folk music.

Mompou studied piano at the Conservatorio del Liceo in Barcelona and gave his first concert at the age of 15. Three years later, with a letter of recommendation from composer Granados, he went to Paris to study piano and harmony. While there, he wrote his first piano pieces, the Impresiones intimas (1911-1914).

He became very taken with Debussy and the modern French composers, especially the spare melodiousness of Erik Satie. Mompou characterized this Satie quality in his music as “recomençament” (starting over at the beginning), a return to a kind of fundamental, basic state of realization. In emulation of Satie, Mompou adopted his method of scoring (in many of the piano works) by eliminating bar lines and key signatures, and (like Bartók and other composers) placing accidentals only before the notes to which they immediately apply. He also picked up the idea of inserting unusual and often illogically humorous comments, directions, and surreal images in the score, which actually serve to suggest the mood of a passage more adequately than the normal emotional and articulation markings — some of Mompou‘s directions were “Chantez avec le fraîcheur de l’herbe humide” and “Donnez des excuses.”

When World War I broke out, Mompou returned to Barcelona, where he continued composing from 1914-1921. His works at that time include the song L’hora grisa (1915) to words by Blancafort, and the piano sets Pessebres (1914-1917), Scènes d’enfants (1915-1918), Cants mágìcs (1917-1919), Fêtes lointaines (1920), and Charmes (1920-1921). Suburbis (1916-1917) contains musical portraits of people encountered during Mompou‘s long walks. They were richly orchestrated by Manuel Rosenthal in 1936. In El carrer, el guitarrista i el cavall (The road, the guitarist and the old horse) a trumpet tune suggests the slow progress of a cart loaded with stone drawn by a weary horse “with large, sad eyes.” An old man grinds a (wonderfully imitated) barrel organ. Gitane I and Gitane II draw portraits of two female gypsy friends, La Fana and La Chatuncha, through teasing dance music. La cegueta expresses gentle empathy for “the little blind girl” whose slow, uncertain walk is expressed by mirrored patterns. In L’home de l’Aristó (The ariston player) we hear a jolly pieces played again by the wandering beggar musician.

In 1921 Mompou returned to Paris where he remained 20 years, and then returned permanently to Barcelona. He was made a Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres by the French government, and elected to the Royal Academy of San Jorge in Barcelona and of San Fernando in Madrid.

The creation of many piano sets extended over large time spans: the 12 Cançons i dansas (1921-1928, 1942-1962), the ten Préludes (1927-1930, 1943-1951), Variaciones sobre un tema di Chopin (1938-57), the brilliant and evocative Paisajes (1942-1960), and Música callada (1959-1967).

Several of his significant songs include the Comptines I-VI (1931, 1943), Combat del somni (1942-1948), and Llueve sobre el rio, Pastoral (1945). His works for chorus are the Cantar del alma (1951) with text from St. John of the Cross, and Improperios (1963) for chorus and orchestra.

Frederic Mompou

The music of the Catalan composer Frederic Mompou (1893–1987) is radically simple, spare, mystical, and utterly unclassifiable as to style—all this in a century that favored intellectual feats on the part of composers who classified themselves into schools and “isms.” The work he regarded as a summation of his life’s efforts was given the quizzical title Música callada—(music that has fallen silent). Find his complete sheet music in our Library.

The restraint of Mompou’s music was matched by the composer’s near-total refusal to engage in self-promotion. Mompou’s music, mostly for piano or voice and piano, at first attracted only a small, highly devoted following. Wider audiences began to discover his works toward the end of the twentieth century, when the Minimalist movement of composers such as Steve Reich and Philip Glass heralded a new spirit of extreme simplicity in classical music, and a new emphasis on the experience of hearing musical raw materials stripped down to their basic forms. John Rockwell of the New York Times, in fact, wrote in Mompou’s obituary that the composer was “an early Minimalist, [who] sought to achieve deep emotional effects through the sparest of musical means.”

Family Background Included Bell Maker

Mompou’s full name was Frederic Mompou i Dencausse. He was born on April 16, 1893, in Barcelona, Spain. Barcelona is in Spain’s Catalonia region, a culturally distinctive area with its own language, Catalan (a blend of Spanish and an old southern French dialect), and a range of indigenous folk music traditions that differ from those heard elsewhere in Spain. Music critic Wilfrid Mellers suggested that Mompou was influenced by these regional traditions. He wrote in the study Le Jardin retrouvé: The Music of Frederic Mompou, “Even today, when we listen to or play one of the piano pieces he calls Cançó i dansa [Song and Dance] we should remember that they are not mere parlor pieces but recollections of activity that is also ritual.” Mompou used both the Catalan (Frederic) and Spanish (Federico) forms of his first name. His last name is generally pronounced as in French (mom-POOH), but Mompou told an interviewer that in Catalonia it would properly be pronounced mom-POH-oo, with all the vowels sounding.

sheet music pdf

Another major influene on Mompou’s creation of his magically simple sound was bells. His maternal grandfather was a member of a French bell-making family that had been in the profession since the 1400s; he had come to Barcelona to set up a bell factory. Mompou himself spent time at the factory, worked there briefly, and learned to tune his ear to the subtle sounds of bells. A unique harmony in his music, known as the metallic chord, was derived from the sound of ringing bells.

Mompou was close to his parents, and they encouraged his interest in music. Friends and extended family often came to the Mompou home to sing and dance, and Mompou was given lessons after he showed talent on the piano. He attended the Conservatorio del Liceo music school in Barcelona and made rapid progress, giving his first concert at age 15. But the severely shy Mompou never really enjoyed performing. He quickly changed direction after hearing pianist Marguerite Long, with the great French composer Gabriel Fauré in attendance, play a concert of Fauré’s music the following year. The concert was, he told Dorle J. Soria of Musical America, his first encounter “with contemporary music of my time and it gave me a great desire to compose.” His first published work was a set of piano pieces called Impresiones intimas (Intimate Impressions), written between 1911 and 1914. “It already had his personality,” Mompou’s wife, Carmen, told Soria, and music historians have agreed, finding the characteristic simple, almost naive quality of Mompou’s adult music already present in the early Impresiones intimas.

Like most of the other young Spanish composers of his day, Mompou decided to study music in Paris, where French composers had written nationalistic Spanish music before Spanish composers themselves began to do so. He arrived at the Paris Conservatory in 1911 with a letter of recommendation written by the leading Spanish composer Enrique Granados, but, typically, was too shy to show it to the admissions committee. Nevertheless, his music stood on its own merits, and he studied piano and harmony at the Conservatory for two years. Remaining in Paris until 1914, he returned home when World War I broke out and became involved in a Catalonian arts movement called Noucentisme, which rejected the confrontational spirit of the avant-garde and emphasized a return to classical values of balance.

Selected Classical Sheet Music

Influenced by French Composers

Mompou had the knack of absorbing influences from various composers while writing music that was quite dissimilar to theirs. Despite his shyness he interacted with other musicians and became acquainted with the leading edge of French music of the early twentieth century. He admired the iconic composers of Paris during the years of World War I, and took something from each of them. Like Claude Debussy, he eschewed any strong sense of directional motion in music, preferring to paint musical colors on an almost static background. Like Maurice Ravel, he was fascinated by the world of childhood and the musical creativity that seemed to reside near its surface; he had a gift for melodies that seemed unassuming, but haunted listeners, who responded to his unique language. From the unconventional, ironic Erik Satie he inherited a belief that radical simplicity had its place, and he showed the same tendency to go his own way rather than follow the prevailing musical fashion. The harmonic stasis of Mompou’s music was matched by an absence of strong rhythmic drive; he frequently wrote his music without bar lines separating one rhythmic unit from another.

free sheet music pdf

Stimulated by the Parisian scene, Mompou returned to Paris in 1921 and remained there for 20 years. The period from World War I through about 1930 was Mompou’s most productive, and he published such piano works as Suburbis (Suburbs, 1917), Scènes d’enfants (Scenes of Children,1918), the Cants mágics (Magic Songs, 1919), and the first four of his Cançós i dansas (Songs and Dances, 1928), along with the beginnings of a small but influential group of French-language songs. His Comptines of 1931 were songs based on children’s number rhymes. Mompou’s lifetime output was slender, amounting to about 200 mostly short pieces collected into a few dozen sets. In the highly competitive and polemical Paris atmosphere, Mompou rarely gave concerts, although he liked to perform for small groups of artists and writers. He lived alone and stayed out of the headlines. Yet a select group of observers were captivated by his music. Critic Emile Vuillermoz wrote of Mompou, in a famous newspaper article quoted by Soria, that “in the Middle Ages the people would have condemned to the stake an artist gifted with such powers.” The argument was an apt one, for Mompou aimed not just at simplicity but at what he called a recommencement, a new beginning that would put music back in touch with its aboriginal power. Mompou was a friend to the French composers Francis Poulenc and Georges Auric, but declined to join the composers’ collective Les Six (The Six), of which they were members.

The 1930s were a melancholic period for Mompou and he stopped composing almost completely between about 1931 and 1937. He reemerged in 1937 with a piano work called Souvenirs d’exposition (Souvenirs of the Fair) and began working on another piece, Variations on a theme of Chopin, that would occupy him for many years. In 1941 Mompou fled the war in France and returned to Barcelona. While judging a piano competition there he was impressed by the performance of a young woman named Carmen Bravo, 30 years his junior. Several years later they married, each for the first time. Mompou joined with a group called the Independent Catalan Composers Movement and reconnected with his musical roots, while still maintaining contact with friends in France.

With these stimuli working in his favor, Mompou began to compose again, continuing to work until he was slowed by a stroke at age 87. In the post-World War II era, dominated by the complex serialist or 12-tone system and its harsh dissonances, Mompou was completely out of fashion—and completely unconcerned. “I am in revolt against the excessive cerebration of our age,” he was quoted as saying by Soria. “Music must cease to be a laboratory product and acquire the lyrical and evocative qualities which spring from personal experience and meditation.”

Wrote Vocal Works

Mompou branched out beyond piano music after World War II, writing a number of Catalonian-language songs and pairing them with texts by poet Josep Janées i Olive. These included the widely recorded Suite compostelana (Compostela Suite) for guitar (1962), and various works for chorus, including the Cantar del alma (Song of the Soul) to a text by the Spanish mystic and ascetic, St. John of the Cross (1542–1591). Mompou was fascinated by St. John of the Cross and borrowed a phrase from one of his writings for the title of the major work of his later years, Música callada.

The 28 pieces in Música callada (four albums, 1959–67), never move faster than a moderate tempo; in free rhythms, they are unassuming yet strangely powerful. This music, Mompou was quoted as saying by Isabelle Leymarie in the UNESCO Courier, “is heard internally. Its emotion is secret, and becomes sound only by reverberating in the coldness of our solitude.” The work, completed in 1967, was premiered in 1972 by Spanish pianist Alicia de Larrocha, to whom it was dedicated. A host of recordings of the work appeared in the late 1990s and early 2000s.

Mompou wrote an oratorio—an unstaged dramatic work—called Los improperios (The Ungrateful Ones) in 1963; although it was his only work to feature a full symphony orchestra, it showed no lack of skill in handling that medium. The text of the work dealt with the Good Friday speech of the crucified Christ rebuking the crowd for its ingratitude, and Mompou set it in a spare style comparable to that of his piano music. Well into his ninth decade Mompou wrote more choral music and a work for cello and piano, El pont. Admirers of Mompou expanded the collection of his works by arranging some of his piano music into two ballets, The House of Birds and Don Perlimpin. Mompou died at age 94 on June 30, 1987, and his popularity only increased following his death.

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