Categories
Jazz Music

Sidney Bechet “Petite Fleur”

Sidney Bechet (May 14, 1897 – May 14, 1959) was an American jazz clarinetist, saxophonist, and composer. He was one of the first important soloists in jazz, beating trumpeter Louis Armstrong to the recording studio by several months. His erratic temperament hampered his career, and not until the late 1940s did he earn wide acclaim.

Sidney Bechet was the first important jazz soloist on records in history (beating Louis Armstrong by a few months). A brilliant soprano saxophonist and clarinetist with a wide vibrato that listeners either loved or hated, Bechet’s style did not evolve much through the years but he never lost his enthusiasm or creativity. A master at both individual and collective improvisation within the genre of New Orleans jazz, Bechet was such a dominant player that trumpeters found it very difficult to play with him. Bechet wanted to play lead and it was up to the other horns to stay out of his way.

Sidney Bechet studied clarinet in New Orleans with Lorenzo Tio, Big Eye Louis Nelson, and George Baquet and he developed so quickly that as a child he was playing with some of the top bands in the city. He even taught clarinet, and one of his students (Jimmie Noone) was actually two years older than him. In 1917, he traveled to Chicago, and in 1919 he joined Will Marion Cook’s orchestra, touring Europe with Cook and receiving a remarkably perceptive review from Ernst Ansermet.

While overseas he found a soprano sax in a store and from then on it was his main instrument. Back in the U.S., Bechet made his recording debut in 1923 with Clarence Williams and during the next two years he appeared on records backing blues singers, interacting with Louis Armstrong and playing some stunning solos. He was with Duke Ellington’s early orchestra for a period and at one point hired a young Johnny Hodges for his own band. However, from 1925-1929 Bechet was overseas, traveling as far as Russia but getting in trouble (and spending jail time) in France before being deported.

Most of the 1930s were comparatively lean times for Bechet. He worked with Noble Sissle on and off and had a brilliant session with his New Orleans Feetwarmers in 1932 (featuring trumpeter Tommy Ladnier). But he also ran a tailor’s shop which was more notable for its jam sessions than for any money it might make. However, in 1938 he had a hit recording of “Summertime,” Hugues Panassie featured Bechet on some records and soon he was signed to Bluebird where he recorded quite a few classics during the next three years.

Bechet worked regularly in New York, appeared on some of Eddie Condon’s Town Hall concerts, and in 1945 he tried unsuccessfully to have a band with the veteran trumpeter Bunk Johnson (whose constant drinking killed the project). Jobs began to dry up about this time, and Bechet opened up what he hoped would be a music school. He only had one main pupil, but Bob Wilber became his protégé.

Sidney Bechet’s fortunes changed drastically in 1949. He was invited to the Salle Pleyel Jazz Festival in Paris, caused a sensation, and decided to move permanently overseas. Within a couple years he was a major celebrity and a national hero in France, even though the general public in the U.S. never did know who he was. Bechet’s last decade was filled with exciting concerts, many recordings, and infrequent visits back to the U.S. before his death from cancer. His colorful (if sometimes fanciful) memoirs Treat It Gentle and John Chilton’s magnificent Bechet biography The Wizard of Jazz (which traces his life nearly week-by-week) are both highly recommended. Many of Sidney Bechet’s recordings are currently available on CD.

“Petite Fleur” is an instrumental written by Sidney Bechet and recorded by him in January 1952, first with the Sidney Bechet All Stars and later with Claude Luter and his Orchestra.

In 1959, it was an international hit as a clarinet solo by Monty Sunshine with Chris Barber’s Jazz Band.[1] This recording, which was made on October 10, 1956, peaked at No. 5 on the US Hot 100 and No. 4 in the UK charts.Outside UK Chris Barber’s version was extremely big in Sweden topping the Swedish best selling chart for no less than 12 weeks according to the branch paper Show Business. Their version was in A♭ minor, in contrast to Bechet’s, which was in G minor.

There was also another recording by Bob Crosby and the Bobcats. Following the Chris Barber instrumental recording, lyrics were added by Fernand Bonifay and Mario Bua in the same year. A different set of lyrics was written by Paddy Roberts and the song was recorded by Teddy Johnson and Pearl Carr in 1959.

Petula Clark recorded the song in French and it was included in her album Hello Paris (1962).

SIDNEY BECHET free sheet music & scores pdf download

Categories
Music Concerts Jazz Music

Amazing: Erroll Garner live 63′ & 64′

Erroll Garner live sheet music download from our LIBRARY.

Erroll Garner live 63' & 64' free sheet music pdf

Erroll Louis Garner (June 15, 1921 – January 2, 1977) was an American jazz pianist and composer known for his swing playing and ballads. His best-known composition, the ballad “Misty”, has become a jazz standard. Scott Yanow of Allmusic calls him “one of the most distinctive of all pianists” and a “brilliant virtuoso.” He received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6363 Hollywood Blvd. His live album, Concert by the Sea, first released in 1955, sold over a million copies by 1958 and Scott Yanow’s opinion is: “this is the album that made such a strong impression that Garner was considered immortal from then on.”

Garner was born with his twin brother Ernest in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on June 15, 1921, the youngest of six children in an African-American family. He attended George Westinghouse High School (as did fellow pianists Billy Strayhorn and Ahmad Jamal). Interviews with his family and music teachers (and with other musicians), plus a detailed family tree are given in Erroll Garner: The Most Happy Piano by James M Doran.

Garner began playing piano at the age of three. His elder siblings were taught piano by Miss Bowman. From an early age, Erroll would sit down and play anything she had demonstrated, just like Miss Bowman, his eldest sister Martha said.[ Garner was self-taught and remained an “ear player” all his life, never learning to read music. At age seven, he began appearing on the radio station KDKA in Pittsburgh with a group called the Candy Kids. By age 11, he was playing on the Allegheny riverboats. In 1937 he joined local saxophonist Leroy Brown.

free sheet music & scores pdf Erroll Garner live 63' & 64'

He played locally in the shadow of his older pianist brother Linton Garner.

Garner moved to New York City in 1944. He briefly worked with the bassist Slam Stewart, and though not a bebop musician per se, in 1947 played with Charlie Parker on the “Cool Blues” session. Although his admission to the Pittsburgh music union was initially refused because of his inability to read music, it relented in 1956 and made him an honorary member.[3] Garner is credited with a superb musical memory. After attending a concert by the Russian classical pianist Emil Gilels, Garner returned to his apartment and was able to play a large portion of the performed music by recall.

Garner made many tours both at home and abroad, and regularly recorded. He was, reportedly, The Tonight Show host Johnny Carson’s favorite jazz musician, appearing on Carson’s show many times over the years.

Garner died of cardiac arrest related to emphysema on January 2, 1977. He is buried in Pittsburgh’s Homewood Cemetery

free sheet music & scores pdf Erroll Garner live 63' & 64'

Short in stature (5 feet 2 inches [157 cm]), Garner performed sitting on multiple telephone directories. He was also known for his vocalizations while playing, which can be heard on many of his recordings. He helped to bridge the gap for jazz musicians between nightclubs and the concert hall.

Called “one of the most distinctive of all pianists” by Scott Yanow, Garner showed that a “creative jazz musician can be very popular without watering down his music” or changing his personal style. He has been described as a “brilliant virtuoso who sounded unlike anyone else”, using an “orchestral approach straight from the swing era but … open to the innovations of bop.” His distinctive style could swing like no other, but some of his best recordings are ballads, such as his best-known composition, “Misty”, which rapidly became a jazz standard – and was featured in Clint Eastwood’s film Play Misty for Me (1971).

Garner may have been inspired by the example of Earl Hines, a fellow Pittsburgh resident but 18 years his senior, and there were resemblances in their elastic approach to timing and use of right-hand octaves. Garner’s early recordings also display the influence of the stride piano style of James P. Johnson and Fats Waller. He developed a signature style that involved his right hand playing behind the beat while his left strummed a steady rhythm and punctuation, creating insouciance and tension. The independence of his hands also was evidenced by his masterful use of three-against-four and more complicated cross-rhythms between the hands. Garner would also improvise whimsical introductions—often in stark contrast to the rest of the tune—that left listeners in suspense as to what the piece would be. His melodic improvisations generally stayed close to the theme while employing novel chord voicings.

Pianist Ross Tompkins described Garner’s distinctiveness as due to ‘happiness’.

Garner’s first recordings were made in late 1944 at the apartment of Timme Rosenkrantz; these were subsequently issued as the five-volume Overture to Dawn series on Blue Note Records. His recording career advanced in the late 1940s when several sides such as “Fine and Dandy”, “Skylark” and “Summertime” were cut. His 1955 live album Concert by the Sea was a best-selling jazz album in its day and features Eddie Calhoun on bass and Denzil Best on drums. This recording of a performance at the Sunset Center, a former school in Carmel-by-the-Sea, California, was made using relatively primitive sound equipment, but for George Avakian the decision to release the recording was easy.

In 1954 Garner composed “Misty”, first recording it in 1955 for the album Contrasts. Lyrics were later added by Johnny Burke. “Misty” rapidly became popular, both as a jazz standard and as the signature song of Johnny Mathis. It was also recorded by Ella Fitzgerald, Frank Sinatra, Sarah Vaughan, Ray Stevens and Aretha Franklin. Clint Eastwood used it as the basis for his thriller Play Misty For Me.

One World Concert was recorded at the 1962 Seattle World Fair (and in 1959 stretching out in the studios) and features Eddie Calhoun on bass and Kelly Martin on drums. Other works include 1951’s Long Ago and Far Away, 1953’s Erroll Garner at the Piano with Wyatt Ruther and Fats Heard, 1957’s The Most Happy Piano, 1970’s Feeling Is Believing and 1974’s Magician, on which Garner performs a number of classic standards. Often the trio was expanded to add Latin percussion, usually a conga.

In 1964, Garner appeared in the UK on the music series Jazz 625 broadcast on the BBC’s new second channel. The programme was hosted by Steve Race, who introduced Garner’s trio with Eddie Calhoun on bass and Kelly Martin on drums.

Because Garner could not write down his musical ideas, he used to record them on tape, to be later transcribed by others.

Categories
Jazz Music

Chet Baker and Bill Evans “How high the Moon” (track nr. 2)

The Complete Legendary Sessions

Chet Baker and Bill Evans – “How high the Moon” with sheet music download

free sheet music & scores pdf Chet Baker and Bill Evans - "How high the Moon"

Lyrics

Somewhere there’s music
How faint the tune
Somewhere there’s heaven
How high the moon
There is no moon above
Love is far away too
‘Til it comes true
That you love me as I love youSomewhere there’s music
How near, how far
Somewhere there’s heaven
It’s where you are
The darkest night would shine
If you would come to me soon
Until you will, how still my heart
How high the moonAah-aah-aah-aah-aah-aah-aah-aah-aahSomewhere there’s music
How faint the tune
Somewhere there’s heaven
How high the moon
The darkest night would shine
If you would come to me soon
Until you will, how still my heart
How high the moon

How High the Moon” is a jazz standard with lyrics by Nancy Hamilton and music by Morgan Lewis. It was first featured in the 1940 Broadway revue Two for the Show, where it was sung by Alfred Drake and Frances Comstock. In Two for the Show, this was a rare serious moment in an otherwise humorous revue.

Chet Baker & Bill Evans: a short Biography

Never have two musicians seemed so alike in temperament yet differed so much in their approach to making music as Chet Baker and Bill Evans. While both were peerless masters of their instruments and shared a rich, evocatively lyrical playing style that bordered beguilingly on the introspective, Baker and Evans were polar opposites when it came to the discipline of performance.

Though both were heroin addicts, the musically-trained Evans never let it interfere with his meticulously precise flights of invention while the self-taught Baker became increasingly erratic and inconsistent. They ventured into a recording studio together on just three occasions, with largely disappointing results, their potentially combustible collaboration failing to ignite and all too frequently sounding workmanlike and uninspiring.

The Complete Legendary Sessions corrals the 15 tracks that resulted from those sessions – previously issued on two 1959 albums: Chet, and Chet Baker Plays the Best of Lerner and Loewe – together for the first time, with a vocals-free Baker concentrating on his horn playing.

Occupying the first 10 tracks (absent from the LP release, Early Morning Mood appears here as a welcome bookend) Chet turns in satisfyingly laidback but unexciting performances. Sparks of energy are provided by Herbie Mann’s flute, the baritone sax of Pepper Adams, Connie Kay and Philly Joe Jones on percussion, guitarist Kenny Burrell and bass man Paul Chambers, who all go about their business with a winningly insouciant confidence.

Album opener Alone Together continues to cast a shimmering, dark-hued spell half a century later, Baker breathing long, lingering, hypnotic lines that flex and flow with understated panache. The prevailing mood is melancholic and down-tempo, with the virtually somnambulant Baker and overly cautious Evans remaining curiously semi-detached from each other throughout.

The Lerner and Loewe material offers livelier fare, but Baker remains strangely subdued and understatement continues to be Evans’s default even in the love-lit delirium of I Could Have Danced All Night. A bonus cover of Almost Like Being in Love sways rather than swings, with Bob Corwin stepping in for Evans.

As a glimpse of what might have been had these two been on form, this tantalises and frustrates in equal measure.

Songs based on “How High the Moon”

Another jazz standard, “Ornithology” by Charlie Parker, is based on the chords of “How High the Moon”. It was common among jazz musicians (Ella Fitzgerald, Lionel Hampton and others) to seamlessly include “Ornithology” in the solo when performing “How High the Moon”. Lennie Tristano wrote the contrafact “Lennie-bird” over the chord changes, and Miles Davis/Chuck Wayne‘s “Solar” is also based on part of the chord structure. Coleman Hawkins’ tune “Bean At Met” is also based on the changes of How High The Moon; this tune starts with simple riffs on the measures 1 to 8 and 17 to 24. The rest is filled up with solos.

John Coltrane‘s composition “Satellite” is also based on the chords of “How High the Moon”, which Coltrane embellished with the three-tonic progression he also used on his composition “Giant Steps“.

Jimmy Giuffre‘s composition “Bright Moon” is also based on the chords of “How High the Moon”. Quincy Jones recorded it in 1957 on his second album, Go West, Man!

The Complete Legendary Sessions (Chet Baker & Bill Evans)

Never have two musicians seemed so alike in temperament yet differed so much in their approach to making music as Chet Baker and Bill Evans. While both were peerless masters of their instruments and shared a rich, evocatively lyrical playing style that bordered beguilingly on the introspective, Baker and Evans were polar opposites when it came to the discipline of performance.


Though both were heroin addicts, the musically-trained Evans never let it interfere with his meticulously precise flights of invention while the self-taught Baker became increasingly erratic and inconsistent. They ventured into a recording studio together on just three occasions, with largely disappointing results, their potentially combustible collaboration failing to ignite and all too frequently sounding workmanlike and uninspiring.

The Complete Legendary Sessions corrals the 15 tracks that resulted from those sessions – previously issued on two 1959 albums: Chet, and Chet Baker Plays the Best of Lerner and Loewe – together for the first time, with a vocals-free Baker concentrating on his horn playing.


Occupying the first 10 tracks (absent from the LP release, Early Morning Mood appears here as a welcome bookend) Chet turns in satisfyingly laidback but unexciting performances. Sparks of energy are provided by Herbie Mann’s flute, the baritone sax of Pepper Adams, Connie Kay and Philly Joe Jones on percussion, guitarist Kenny Burrell and bass man Paul Chambers, who all go about their business with a winningly insouciant confidence.


Album opener Alone Together continues to cast a shimmering, dark-hued spell half a century later, Baker breathing long, lingering, hypnotic lines that flex and flow with understated panache. The prevailing mood is melancholic and down-tempo, with the virtually somnambulant Baker and overly cautious Evans remaining curiously semi-detached from each other throughout.


The Lerner and Loewe material offers livelier fare, but Baker remains strangely subdued and understatement continues to be Evans’s default even in the love-lit delirium of I Could Have Danced All Night. A bonus cover of Almost Like Being in Love sways rather than swings, with Bob Corwin stepping in for Evans.


As a glimpse of what might have been had these two been on form, this tantalises and frustrates in equal measure. Version 1, edited by VaMpkt on 8 April 2011, 1:24pm · View version history

bill evans sheet music
Categories
Jazz Music

Dave Brubeck Trio feat. Gerry Mulligan & Paul Desmond – Berliner Jazztage 1972

● Tracklist:

00:00:23 – Blues for Newport 00:14:14 – All The Things You Are 00:25:21 – For All We Know 00:29:27 – Line for Lyons 00:35:17 – Blessed Are The Poor (The Sermon on The Mount) 00:40:57 – Mexican Jumping Bean 00:47:31 – Sign Off 00:58:44 – Someday My Prince Will Come 01:07:18 – These Foolish Things (That Reminds Me Of You) 01:11:46 – Take The “A” Train

● Personnel:

Dave Brubeck – piano Paul Desmond – alto sax Gerry Mulligan – baritone sax Jack Six – bass Alan Dawson – drums ● Dave Brubeck Trio feat. Gerry Mulligan & Paul Desmond – Berliner Jazztage 1972 Recorded live on November 4th, 1972 at Berliner Philharmonie, Berlin, Germany.

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Categories
Jazz Music

Bill Evans – Danny Boy, by Frederic Weatherly (Bill Evans Jazz version)

Bill Evans – Danny Boy, by Frederic Weatherly (Bill Evans Jazz version) with sheet music

“Danny Boy” is a ballad, written by English songwriter Frederic Weatherly in 1913, and set to the traditional Irish melody of “Londonderry Air”.
In 1910, in Bath, Somerset, the English lawyer and lyricist Frederic Weatherly initially wrote the words to “Danny Boy” to a tune other than “Londonderry Air”. After his Irish-born sister-in-law Margaret Enright Weatherly (known as Jess) in the United States sent him a copy of “Londonderry Air” in 1913 (an alternative version of the story has her singing the air to him in 1912 with different lyrics), Weatherly modified the lyrics of “Danny Boy” to fit the rhyme and meter of “Londonderry Air”.

Weatherly gave the song to the vocalist Elsie Griffin, who made it one of the most popular songs in the new century. In 1915, Ernestine Schumann-Heink produced the first recording of “Danny Boy”.

Jane Ross of Limavady is credited with collecting the melody of “Londonderry Air” in the mid-19th century from a musician she encountered.

The 1913 lyrics by Frederick E. Weatherly:

Oh, Danny boy, the pipes, the pipes are calling
From glen to glen, and down the mountain side.
The summer’s gone, and all the roses falling,
It’s you, It’s you must go and I must bide.
But come ye back when summer’s in the meadow,
Or when the valley’s hushed and white with snow,
It’s I’ll be here in sunshine or in shadow,—
Oh, Danny boy, O Danny boy, I love you so!

But when ye come, and all the flowers are dying,
If I am dead, as dead I well may be,
Ye’ll come and find the place where I am lying,
And kneel and say an Avè there for me.
And I shall hear, though soft you tread above me,
And all my grave will warmer, sweeter be,
For you will bend and tell me that you love me,
And I shall sleep in peace until you come to me!

Various suggestions exist as to the true meaning of “Danny Boy”. Some have interpreted the song to be a message from a parent to a son going off to a war or uprising (as suggested by the reference to “pipes calling glen to glen”) or leaving as part of the Irish diaspora.

The 1918 version of the sheet music with Weatherly’s printed signature included alternative lyrics (“Eily Dear”), with the instructions that “when sung by a man, the words in italic should be used; the song then becomes “Eily Dear”, so that “Danny Boy” is only to be sung by a lady”. In spite of this, it is unclear whether this was Weatherly’s intent. The song has been performed by a diverse range of male singers, including Irish tenor John McCormack, Jim Reeves, Mario Lanza, Bing Crosby, Andy Williams, Eric Clapton, Johnny Cash, Sam Cooke, Elvis Presley, Shane MacGowan, Jackie Wilson, Daniel O’Donnell, Harry Belafonte, Tom Jones, John Gary, Frank Patterson, Thomas Quasthoff, Stuart Burrows, Jacob Collier, Harry Connick Jr., and comedian Peter Kay amongst many others. All used the original lyrics with slight variations.

The song is popular for funerals; but, as it is not liturgical, its suitability as a funeral song is sometimes contested. In 1928, Weatherly himself suggested that the second verse would provide a fitting requiem for the actress Ellen Terry.

But perhaps the greatest mystery about “Danny Boy” is its meaning. Who is Danny? Who’s singing to him, and why must he leave? Why will he and the narrator likely never see each other again? 

This ambiguity, this very universal lament about separation and the finality of death, and the greater power of love, has spoken to people of many nationalities and faiths, and to artists and singers from nearly every genre of music.

From John McCormack to Bill Evans, to the Mormon Tabernacle Choir, Johnny Cash, Elvis, Joan Baez, Patti LaBelle and innumerable others, “Danny Boy” expresses what Weatherly knew: that unlike the deepest philosophy, history, or sermon, “song and story appeal to the heart. From the heart they come and to the heart they must go.”

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Categories
Jazz Music

13 Vintage Halloween Jazz Songs from the 1940’s, & 50’s

You’ve Got Me Voodoo’d by Charlie Barnet & Mary Ann McCall 1940 – White Zombie (1932) The Headless Horseman by Bing Crosby 1949 – The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad (1949) The Walls Keep Talking by Anita O’Day 1941 – Original performance footage Punky Punkin by Rosemary Clooney 1950 – Disney’s Trick or Treat (1952) with Donald Duck Haunted Heart by Frances Langford 1948 – The Ghost Breakers (1940) Autumn Serenade by The Modernaires 1945 – The Trouble with Harry (1955) Spooks by Louis Armstrong 1954 – Disney’s Haunted House (1929) featuring Mickey Mouse Autumn Leaves by Nat King Cole 1957 – Original performance footage October Twilight by Frankie Carle 1947 – Disney’s Silly Symphonies “The Old Mill” (1937) A Ghost of a Chance by Frances Langford 1948 – Rebecca (1940) Tis Autumn by Rosemary Clooney – Original performance footage Yodeling Ghost by Patsy Montana 1954 – Heidi’s Song (1982) Trick or Treat by Paul Smith & His Orchestra 1952 – Disney’s Trick or Treat (1952) with Donald Duck

13 Vintage Halloween Jazz Songs from the 1940’s, & 50’s

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Categories
Jazz Music

The Best of Billie Holiday (1)

Table of Contents

    The Best of Billie Holiday Jazz with Sheet Music

    Tracklist

    1 On the Sunny Side of the Street (McHugh – Fields) (1944) 00:00 Eddie Heywood (piano), John Simmons (bass), Sidney Catlett (drums) 2 All of Me (Marks – Simons) (march 21, 1941) 02:59 Eddie Heywood and His Orchestra ft: Lester Young (tenor sax) 3 I Can’t Get Started (Duke – Gershwin) (1938) 06:01 Billie Holiday and Her Orchestra ft: Lester Young (tenor sax) 4 God Bless the Child (Holiday) (1941) 08:48 Billie Holiday and Her Orchestra, ft: Roy Eldridge (trumpet), Eddie Heywood (piano) 5 Am I Blue (Clark – Akst) (1941) 11:42 Billie Holiday and Her Orchestra, featuring: Roy Eldridge (trumpet), Eddie Heywood (piano)

    6 Billie’s Blues (I Love My Man) (Holiday) (1944) 14:31 Eddie Heywood (piano), John Simmons (bass), Sidney Catlett (drums) 7 Body and Soul (Green – Heyman – Sour) (1940) 17:38 Billie Holiday and Her Orchestra ft: Roy Eldridge (trumpet) 8 Summertime (Gershwin – Heyward ) (1936) 20:34 Billie Holiday and Her Orchestra ft: Bunny Berigan (trumpet). Artie Shaw (clarinet) 9 Georgia on My Mind (Carmichael) (1941) 23:27 Eddie Heywood and His Orchestra ft: Eddie Heywood (piano) 10 I Can’t Give You Anything But Love (McHugh Fields) (1936) 26:43 Teddy Wilson and His Orchestra, ft: Jonah Jones (trumpet), Ben Webster (tenor sax), Benny Goodman (clarinet)

    11 Lover come Back to Me (Romberg – Hammerstein) (1944) 30:08 Eddie Heywood (piano), John Simmons (bass), Sidney Catlett (drums) 12 Pennies from Heaven (Johnstone – Burke) (1936) 33:26 Teddy Wilson and His Orchestra, ft: Ben Webster (tenor sax), Benny Goodman (clarinet) 13 My Man (Yvain – Pollack) (1937) 36:40 Teddy Wilson and His Orchestra, ft: Prince Robinson (clarinet), Buck Claytron (trumpet) 14 Night and Day (Porter) (1939) 39:41 Billie Holiday and Her Orchestra ft: Joe Sullivan (piano) 15 Them There Eyes (Pinkard – Tracey – Link) (1939) 42:37 Billie Holiday and Her Orchestra ft: Tab Smith (alto sax), Charlie Shavers (trumpet), Kenneth Hollon (tenor sax)

    16 Love Me or Leave Me (Donaldson – Kahn) (1941) 45:25 Teddy Wilson and His Orchestra, ft: Babe Russin (tenor sax) 17 Lover Man (Ramirez – Sherman – Davis) (1944) 48:43 Orchestra arranged and conducted by Toots Camarata 18 The Man I Love (Gershwin) (1939) 51:58 Billie Holiday and Her Orchestra ft: Lester Young (tenor sax) 19 The Very Thought of You (Noble) (1938) 55:00 Billie Holiday and Her Orchestra ft: Margaret Johnson (piano), Busk Clayton (trumpet), Lester Young (clarinet) 20 Yesterdays (Kern – Harbach) (1939) 57:43 Billie Holiday and Her Orchestra, ft: Sonny White (piano), Kenneth Hollon (tenor sax)

    21 These Foolish Things (Strachey – Marvell) (1936 ) 1:01:02 Teddy Wilson and His Orchestra, ft Wilson (piano), Harry Carney (baritone sax), Johnny Hodges (alto sax), Jonah Jones (trumpet) 22 My Old Flame (Coslow – Johnson) (1944) 1:04:19 Eddie Heywood and His Orchestra 23 They Can’t Take That Away from Me (Gershwin) (1937) 1:07:17 Billie Holiday and Her Orchestra ft: Teddy Wilson (piano), Buster Bailey (clarinet) 24 St. Louis Blues (Handy) (1940) 1:10:18 Benny Carter and His Orchestra, ft: Benny Morton (trombone), Georgie Auld (tenor sax), Bill Coleman (trumpet) 25 Strange Fruit (Allan) (1939) 1:13:10 Billie Holiday and Her Orchestra ft: Frank Newton (trumpet), Sonny White (piano)

    Biography

    Eleanora Fagan (April 7, 1915 – July 17, 1959), professionally known as Billie Holiday, was an American jazz and swing music singer with a career spanning 26 years. Nicknamed “Lady Day” by her friend and music partner Lester Young, Holiday had an innovative influence on jazz music and pop singing. Her vocal style, strongly inspired by jazz instrumentalists, pioneered a new way of manipulating phrasing and tempo. She was known for her vocal delivery and improvisational skills.

    She was a successful concert performer throughout the 1950s with two further sold-out shows at Carnegie Hall. Because of personal struggles and an altered voice, her final recordings were met with mixed reaction but were mild commercial successes. Her final album, Lady in Satin, was released in 1958. Holiday died of cirrhosis on July 17, 1959. She won four Grammy Awards, all of them posthumously, for Best Historical Album. She was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1973. Lady Sings the Blues, a film about her life, starring Diana Ross, was released in 1972.

    She is the primary character in the play (later made into a film) Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar and Grill; the role was originated by Reenie Upchurch in 1986 and was played by Audra McDonald on Broadway and in the film. In 2017 Holiday was inducted into the National Rhythm & Blues Hall of Fame.

    Sheet Music download from our Library.

    billie holiday free sheet music pdf
    billie holiday sheet music pdf
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    Jazz Music

    Dave Brubeck Quartet St Louis Blues Belgium (1964)

    Dave Brubeck Quartet St Louis Blues Belgium (1964) with sheet music

    sheet music pdf
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    Dave Brubeck – Bossa Nova USA – 1963 – Full Album

    Dave Brubeck – Bossa Nova USA – 1963 – Full Album (sheet music to download from our Library)

    dave brubeck free sheet music & scores pdf

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    Chet Baker and Bill Evans “You and the night and the music”

    bill evans sheet music

    Chet Baker and Bill Evans “You and the night and the music” sheet music download.