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Jazz Music

Dave Brubeck live 64’/66′ – Jazz Icons

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Dave Brubeck live 64’/66′ – Jazz Icons

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Personnel

Dave Brubeck – piano Paul Desmond – alto saxophone Eugene Wright – double bass Joe Morello – drums

Live in Belgium 1964

Track list

1. St Louis Blues — 00:1308:34 2. Koto Song — 08:3514:35 3. Three to Get Ready 14:3718:52 4. In your own sweet way 18:5325:01 5. Take Five — 25:0232:24 Live in Germany 1966 6. Take the A train — 32:3542:22 7. 40 days — 42:2648:32 8. I´m in a Dancing Mood 48:5051:45 9. Koto Song (Live 1966) 51:5159:50 10. Take Five ( Live 1966) 59:541:05:07

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Dave Brubeck

David Warren Brubeck (/ˈbruːbɛk/; December 6, 1920 – December 5, 2012) was an American jazz pianist and composer, considered one of the foremost exponents of cool jazz. Many of his compositions have become jazz standards including “In Your Own Sweet Way” and “The Duke”. Brubeck’s style ranged from refined to bombastic, reflecting both his mother’s classical training and his own improvisational skills. His music is known for employing unusual time signatures as well as superimposing contrasting rhythms, meters, and tonalities.

Brubeck experimented with time signatures throughout his career, recording “Unsquare Dance” in 7/4, “World’s Fair” in 13/4, and “Blue Rondo à la Turk” in 9/8. He was also a composer of orchestral and sacred music and wrote soundtracks for television, such as Mr. Broadway and the animated miniseries This Is America, Charlie Brown.

Often incorrectly attributed to Brubeck, the song “Take Five“, which has become a jazz standard, was composed by Brubeck’s long-time musical partner, alto saxophonist Paul Desmond. Appearing on one of the top-selling jazz albums, Time Out, and written in 5/4 time, “Take Five” has endured as a jazz classic associated with Brubeck.

Dave Brubeck, declared a “Living Legend” by the Library of Congress, was one of the most active and popular jazz musicians in the world. His experiments with odd time signatures, improvised counterpoint, and a distinctive harmonic approach were the hallmarks of his unique musical style.

Born into a musically inclined family — his two older brothers were professional musicians — he began taking piano lessons from his mother, a classical pianist, at age four. After graduating from College of the Pacific in 1942, he enlisted in the Army, and while serving in Europe led an integrated G.I. jazz band.

At the end of World War II, he studied composition at Mills College with French classical composer Darius Milhaud, who encouraged him to introduce jazz elements into his classical compositions. This experimentation with mixed genres led to the formation of the Dave Brubeck Octet that included Paul Desmond, Bill Smith, and Cal Tjader. In 1949, Brubeck formed an award-winning trio with Cal Tjader and Ron Crotty, and in 1951 expanded the band to include Desmond. Brubeck became the first jazz artist to make the cover of Time magazine, in 1954, and in 1958 performed in Europe and the Middle East for the U.S. State Department, leading to the introduction of music from other cultures into his repertoire. In 1959, the Dave Brubeck Quartet recorded an experiment in time signatures, Time Out. The album sold more than a million copies, and Brubeck’s “Blue Rondo a la Turk,” based on a Turkish folk rhythm, and Desmond’s “Take Five” appeared on jukeboxes throughout the world.

Throughout his career, Brubeck continued to experiment with integrating jazz and classical music. In 1959, he premiered and recorded his brother Howard’s Dialogues for Jazz Combo and Orchestra with the New York Philharmonic under Leonard Bernstein. In 1960, he composed Points on Jazz for the American Ballet Theatre, and in later decades composed for and performed with the Murray Louis Dance Co. His musical theater piece, The Real Ambassadors starring Louis Armstrong and Carmen McRae, was also written and recorded in 1960 and performed to great acclaim at the 1962 Monterey Jazz Festival. The classic Dave Brubeck Quartet with Paul Desmond, Eugene Wright, and Joe Morello was dissolved in December 1967 and Brubeck’s first of many oratorios, The Light in the Wilderness, premiered in 1968.

He received many honors in the U.S. and abroad for his contribution to jazz, including the National Medal of Arts, a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award, the Kennedy Center Honors, and the Austrian Medal of the Arts. In 2008, Brubeck received the Benjamin Franklin Award for Public Diplomacy from the U.S. State Department for “introducing the language, the sounds, and the spirit of jazz to new generations around the world.”

Selected Discography

Jazz at Oberlin, Original Jazz Classics, 1953
Time Out, Columbia, 1959
The Real Ambassadors, Columbia/Legacy, 1961
Classical Brubeck, Telarc, 2002
London Flat, London Sharp, Telarc, 2004

Compilations

  • Dave Brubeck’s Greatest Hits (Columbia CS 9284 / CL 2484, 1966)
  • Interchanges ’54 (Columbia Jazz Masterpieces 467917 2, 1991)
  • Ballads (Legacy 501795 2, 2001)
  • The Essential Dave Brubeck (Columbia Legacy, 2003)
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Jazz Music

Stacey Kent – a Jazz singer

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Stacey Kent – a Jazz singer

Stacey Kent (born March 27, 1968) is a Grammy-nominated American jazz singer. Kent was awarded the Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres (Order of Arts and Letters) by the French Minister of Culture in 2009. She is married to saxophonist Jim Tomlinson.

Stacey Kent is a jazz singer in the mould of the greats, with a legion of fans worldwide, a host of honors and awards including a Grammy nomination, album sales in excess of 2 million, Platinum, Double-Gold and Gold-selling albums that have reached a series of No. 1 chart positions during the span of her career.

Her album, I Know I Dream: The Orchestral Sessions (Sony) has had more than 40 million streams, won ‘Album of the Year’ in the vocal category at the 2018 Jazz Japan Awards, and received glowing reviews, including a coveted five stars in Downbeat, and was described by All About Jazz as “intoxicating understatement at its finest…one more jewel in a discography with many, it’s one that deserves singling out for its luster.”

This comparative literature graduate with a passion for music, travelled to Europe to further her studies, and after receiving her degree from Sarah Lawrence College in NY, through a series of twists of fate, she found herself in London where she enrolled in a graduate music program at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama, where she met her future husband and musical partner, Jim Tomlinson.

Kent’s musical journey began in her childhood with piano lessons. A keen ear and true voice lead her to search out opportunities to express her love of music. However, nothing suggested the shift from the academic path to the path that propelled her to international recognition as one of the foremost jazz singers of her generation. With a catalogue of 11 studio albums, including the Platinum-selling, Grammy-nominated Breakfast On The Morning Tram (EMI/Blue Note 2007) and an impressive list of collaborations, Stacey has graced the stages of more than 55 countries over the course of her career.

Kent paid her dues in the jazz clubs of London, before releasing the first of a series of albums for the Candid label, beginning with Close Your Eyes in 1997. Her second album, The Tender Trap (1999) brought her to the attention of US audiences with appearances on CBS Sunday Morning and NPR’s All Things Considered. Albums and awards followed, with Stacey winning the ‘Jazz Vocalist of the Year’ at the BBC Jazz Awards. The Boy Next Door (2003) was Stacey’s last Candid release and her first album to achieve Gold status.

During this period, Stacey cemented her reputation as a singer capable of putting a distinctive stamp on an impressive repertoire of standards. Her ability to communicate emotion through a nuanced and minimalist approach was showcased on Jim Tomlinson’s album, The Lyric (Token) which was awarded Album of The Year at the 2006 BBC Jazz Awards. This album brought her to the attention of Blue Note records with whom she signed in 2007. With each successive album, Stacey’s style has become more honed as her artistic outlook has broadened, leading her beyond the Great American Songbook to French chanson and Brazilian music which form an ever-larger part of her repertoire.

Stacey’s repertoire also includes a growing number of songs written for her by Jim Tomlinson with various lyricists, most notably the Nobel Prize-winning author, Kazuo Ishiguro. The idea of singing original compositions came up during a lunch with Ishiguro. The conversation turned to music, and the idea was hatched to write a series of songs for Stacey that distilled themes of memory, travel and love, that so frequently surfaced in her repertoire. From this conversation, the songs for Breakfast On The Morning Tram were conceived.

Almost overnight, Stacey transformed from being a singer of the Great American Songbook, to a singer with a highly distinctive and personal repertoire. The first collaboration between Ishiguro, the lyricist, and Tomlinson, the composer, The Ice Hotel, won first prize in the jazz category of the International Songwriting Competition. Since then, all of Stacey’s albums have been punctuated by original songs composed by Tomlinson with a variety of lyricists in English, French and Portuguese.

Kent has continued to pursue a frenetic recording and touring schedule. Her first album for Blue Note was followed in 2009 by the Gold-selling, all-French, Raconte-Moi which was that year’s biggest selling French language album outside of France. She was invited to perform an all-French program at the Francofolies Festival and was awarded the Chevalier Dans L’Ordre Des Arts et Des Lettres. Her first ever live album, Dreamer In Concert (EMI 2011), was followed by The Changing Lights (Warner 2013), which more than any other album, reveals the ever-present influence of Brazil in Stacey’s music.

Among French, Italian and German, Stacey also speaks Portuguese. She has toured widely in Brazil and collaborated with many of her heroes including Edu Lobo, Dori and Danilo Caymmi, Roberto Menescal, and most notably Marcos Valle, who invited her to celebrate his 50 years in music on the album, Ao Vivo (Sony 2013). A DVD and documentary of their collaboration and friendship was also released on Sony in 2016.

With Roberto Menescal, Stacey recorded Tenderly (Sony), an intimate collection of standards that showcases her crystalline voice and Menescal’s warm guitar. Jazzwise Magazine referred to the album as “an extremely beautiful meeting of minds” It is Menescal’s only full album as a jazz guitarist and demonstrates the debt he owes to the great Barney Kessel. As Kent’s first standards album in a decade, it shows her increasingly impressive and maturing interpretative gifts.

Whilst the COVID 19 pandemic has put Stacey’s concert appearances on pause, she has been busy recording from home and staying in touch with her fans through social media. She has recently released several recordings including Bob Marley’s Three Little Birds and Bill Wither’s Lovely Day, with messages of hope for these troubled times, as well as the EP, Christmas In The Rockies (Token 2020). Stacey is also currently releasing a series of singles with her long-standing piano accompanist, Art Hirahara, entitled Songs From Other Places, which will include, among others, new original songs from Jim Tomlinson & Kazuo Ishiguro.

Songs From Other Places will be released as a full album in autumn, 2021. Her forthcoming studio album, Summer Me, Winter Me, originally scheduled for release in October 2020 is now planned for release sometime in 2022. 

Early life and education

Stacey Kent was born in South Orange, New Jersey and attended Newark Academy in Livingston, New Jersey. Her paternal grandfather was Russian and grew up in France. After graduating from Sarah Lawrence College, she traveled to England to study music at Guildhall School of Music and Drama in London, where she met saxophonist Jim Tomlinson, whom she married on August 9, 1991.

Career

In the 1990s, she began her professional career singing at Café Bohème in London’s Soho. After two or three years, she began opening for established acts at Ronnie Scott’s Jazz Club in London. In 1995, she appeared in Richard Loncraine‘s film “Richard III” (starring Ian McKellen), singing “Come Live with Me and Be My Love” (composed by Trevor Jones) at the Grand Ball celebrating the Yorkist triumph in the Wars of the Roses. Her first album, Close Your Eyes, was released in 1997. (An 11-track cassette release ‘Stacey Kent Sings’ was recorded in July 1995, which may be a set of demos).

Novelist Kazuo Ishiguro wrote the liner notes to Kent’s 2003 album, In Love Again. Ishiguro met Kent after he chose her recording of “They Can’t Take That Away from Me” as one of his Desert Island Discs in 2002. In 2006, Tomlinson and Ishiguro began to write songs for her. Ishiguro has said of his lyric writing that “with an intimate, confiding, first-person song, the meaning must not be self-sufficient on the page. It has to be oblique, sometimes you have to read between the lines” and that this realization has had an “enormous influence” on his fiction writing.

Tomlinson and Ishiguro co-wrote four songs on the album Breakfast on the Morning Tram. The first of their songs, “The Ice Hotel”, won first prize in the International Songwriting Competition in April 2008. Kent recorded several more Tomlinson/Ishiguro songs on Dreamer In Concert, The Changing Lights, and I Know I Dream: The Orchestral Sessions.

Tomlinson and Ishiguro have subsequently written songs for three more of her albums (Dreamer, The Changing Lights and I Know I Dream) and continue to write for her today.

Popular success

stacey kent sheet music

Stacey Kent onstage in 2016

Kent’s album The Boy Next Door achieved Gold album status in France in September 2006. Breakfast on the Morning Tram (2007) achieved Platinum album status in France in November 2007 and Double Gold status in Germany in February 2008. Raconte-moi… was recorded in French and achieved Gold status in both France and Germany and became the second best selling French language album worldwide in 2010.

Dreamer In Concert (2011) was recorded in May, 2011, at La Cigale in Paris. The album includes three songs previously unrecorded by Kent: “Waters of March” by Antonio Carlos Jobim, “Postcard Lovers” by Jim Tomlinson with lyrics by Kazuo Ishiguro, and “O Comboio” by Portuguese poet António Ladeira.

In 2013, Kent released The Changing Lights, a Brazilian-tinged album, covering bossa nova classics such as Jobim’s “How Insensitive” and again collaborating with Tomlinson and Ishiguro. In 2014, she left Warner Bros. and signed with Sony. Sony released Tenderly, an album of standards with Roberto Menescal, one of the founders of bossa nova. She met Menescal in Brazil in 2011 at the 80th birthday celebration of the Christ the Redeemer statue. They discovered they were fans of each other’s work and collaborated on an album of standards inspired by Menescal’s admiration for the duo of Julie London and Barney Kessel.

In 2014, Marcos Valle invited her to tour in celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of his career. They recorded the album Ao Vivo and a DVD that was recorded live at the Birdland club in New York City and the Blue Note in Tokyo.

In 2017, Kent recorded her next album for Sony, I Know I Dream: The Orchestral Sessions, her first album with an orchestra, comprising 58 musicians with arrangements by Tommy Laurence, with music from the Great American Songbook, French chansons, songs by Edu Lobo, Jobim, Tomlinson, Ishiguro, Ladeira and his songwriting partner, Cliff Goldmacher from Nashville. Tomlinson and Goldmacher wrote the title song. By 2020, the album had reached 40 million streams.

In 2020, Kent released a series of singles and EPs, including “Christmas in the Rockies”, “Three Little Birds”, “Lovely Day”, “Landslide”, “I Wish I Could Go Travelling Again” as a duet with her longtime pianist, Art Hirahara.

Awards and honors

Discography

トップステイシーケントの歌 – Stacey Kent Greatest Hits Playlist 2019

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Did you know? Jazz Music

JAZZ PORTRAITS (2000–2010)

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JAZZ PORTRAITS: 2000–2010

Courtesy of the Journal of Jazz Studes. The images collected here, unless otherwise indicated, are all from events in the New York City area.

Musicians featured in this collection of Ed Berger’s photographs include Eric Alexander, Geri Allen, Billy Bang, Eddie Bert, Ray Bryant, Candido, Ron Carter, Marc Cary, Dave Douglas, Kurt Elling, Ned Goold, Wycliffe Gordon, Henry Grimes, Chico Hamilton, Roy Hargrove, Barry Harris, Jon Hendricks, Fred Hersch, Ingrid Jensen, Howard Johnson, Kidd Jordan, Teo Macero, Russell Malone, Branford Marsalis, Christian McBride, Grachan Moncur III, Paul Motian, Nicki Parrott, Les Paul, Jeremy Pelt, Houston Person, Riza Printup, Dizzy Reece, Eric Reed, Sam Rivers, Scott Robinson, Fred Staton, George Wein, Frank Wess, Joe Wilder, and Jackie Williams.

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The Journal of Jazz Studies (JJS) is published by the Institute of Jazz Studies at the Newark campusof Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. The editors of JJS are Edward Berger, HenryMartin, and Dan Morgenstern; the managing editor is Evan Spring. JJS is hosted online by the Rutgers University Libraries at http://jjs.libraries.rutgers.edu.

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Edward Berger

The images collected here, unless otherwise indicated, are all from events in the New York City area. Those from 2006 and earlier were made on film using Leica 35mm or Pentax medium format equipment. All images from 2007 and after were made using Nikon digital cameras. I would like to thank Jack Kleinsinger, longtime producer of the Highlights in Jazz concert series; Loren Schoenberg of the Jazz Museum in Harlem and Tim McHenry of the Rubin Museum of Art, producers of the Harlem in the Himalayas concert series; and Lynne Mueller of the Jazz Ministry at St. Peter’s Church for allowing me to photograph at their events.

Musicians featured in this collection of Ed Berger’s photographs include Eric Alexander, Geri Allen, Billy Bang, Eddie Bert, Ray Bryant, Candido, Ron Carter, Marc Cary, Dave Douglas, Kurt Elling, Ned Goold, Wycliffe Gordon, Henry Grimes, Chico Hamilton, Roy Hargrove, Barry Harris, Jon Hendricks, Fred Hersch, Ingrid Jensen, Howard Johnson, Kidd Jordan, Teo Macero, Russell Malone, Branford Marsalis, Christian McBride, Grachan Moncur III, Paul Motian, Nicki Parrott, Les Paul, Jeremy Pelt, Houston Person, Riza Printup, Dizzy Reece, Eric Reed, Sam Rivers, Scott Robinson, Fred Staton, George Wein, Frank Wess, Joe Wilder, and Jackie Williams.

Thanks, also, to the musicians for their indulgence. In order to limit the file size, these photos are intended for online viewing at normal screen size. Anyone wanting to purchase prints may contact at eberger4@verizon.net.

EDWARD BERGER recently retired after three decades at the Institute of Jazz Studies (IJS) to pursue freelance writing and photography. He is a regular contributor to JazzTimes as both writer and photographer, and author or coauthor of three works in the Scarecrow Press/IJS Studies in Jazz series: Benny Carter: A Life in American Music; Bassically Speaking: An Oral History of George Duvivier; and Reminiscing in Tempo: The Life and Times of a Jazz Hustler, the memoirs of producer Teddy Reig. His photographs have appeared in many periodicals as well as on recordings by such artists as Benny Carter, Phil Woods, Frank Wess, Quincy Jones, and Ray Bryant. He is currently working on a biodiscography of trumpeter Joe Wilder.

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Jazz Music

Dream a little dream of me – Piano solo arr. with sheet music

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Dream a little dream of me – Piano solo arr. with sheet music

Dream A Little Dream sheet music score download partitura partition spartiti 楽譜

The Story Of ‘Dream A Little Dream’

For lyricists, dreams have long been the stuff that ballads are made of. In piano bars from the roaring ’20s to the present, crooners have offered up a succession of dreamy hits like “I’ll See You In My Dreams,” “This Time the Dream’s On Me,” “Dream, Dream, Dream.” And though instant popularity doesn’t guarantee that a song will endure, ask pedestrians on any city street to sing a few lines of “Dream a Little Dream of Me,” and its relevance shows.

Cass Elliott and The Mamas and The Papas‘ 1968 recording of “Dream a Little Dream of Me” sold nearly seven million copies almost 40 years after the music was composed by two relatively unknown musicians, Fabian Andre and Wilber Schwandt. The words were written by Gus Kahn, one of the most successful lyricists of the 1920s, ’30s and ’40s, and the same writer who gave us “Ain’t We Got Fun,” “It Had To Be You” and “Making Whoopie.”

Gus Kahn lived in Chicago. He began writing songs professionally at 23. His first song-writing partner was his wife, pianist and composer Grace Laboy. Soon he was writing lyrics to music by some of the biggest names in the business, Walter Donaldson, George Gershwin, Isham Jones, and Naceo Herb Brown.

“Johnny Mercer, who was one of the really other great lyric writers, used to call my father the tune hog,” Gus Kahn’s son, composer Donald Kahn remembers, “because my dad wrote with everybody and ‘Dream a Little Dream’ is a sterling example of it. My dad would get tunes from people and my mother would play the tunes for him and he would sit and grumble mostly.

“He always tried to keep his lyrics simple,” the younger Kahn explains, “but he also said that young men and women do not know how to say ‘I love you’ to one another so we say it for them in 32 bars. “

There’s considerable confusion as to when and where Fabian Andre and Wilber Schwandt wrote the music for “Dream a Little Dream of Me.” They played together in a band that toured the Midwest in 1930. Schwandt once recalled that they wrote the piece during a 10-minute break at a gig in Paw Paw, Michigan. Later he said they wrote it in Milwaukee. Wherever the music was written, Donald Kahn credits the melody and, in particular, its bridge, for making the song work.

“Being a musician myself I am very fond of the change in the bridge in which they go to a whole other very unusual key,” Kahn says. “Instead of going the obvious or the simple way it might have gone, it goes to a very interesting and new sounding key.

Over the years, “Dream a Little Dream” has been recorded by Kate Smith, Nat “King” Cole, Louis Armstrong and Ella Fitzgerald. But the definitive version was recorded by Cass Elliott and The Mamas and The Papas for the 1968 album, “The Papas and The Mamas.”

The Mamas and The Papas recorded “Dream a Little Dream” by chance. In 1950, in Mexico City, six-year-old Michelle Phillips met Fabian Andre, one of the song’s co-writers.

“He was just a fabulous rake,” Phillips recalls. “We liked him a lot. He was a big drinker, however. He loved to play the piano. He was–I have this image of Fabian at the piano all the time. I don’t have any other image of him, as a matter of fact. Just singing and playing and drinking at the piano.”

Almost 20 years later, in 1968, The Mamas and The Papas, Michelle and John Phillips, Denny Doherty and Cass Elliott, were rehearsing one day when Michelle got word that Fabian Andre had died in a fall down an elevator shaft in Mexico City.

“It was very shocking, you know,” says Phillips. “I said, can you imagine this guy who wrote this fabulous song–and John had remembered, at that point, that I had told him about Fabian and the song and we had never thought about it again until we were all sitting around that day discussing his death, when we started to pick out the song and–to see if we could remember the lyrics to it. And we said, `Cass, come here. Sing this.’ “

“Dream a Little Dream of Me” became Cass Elliott’s signature song. This was the kind of music she originally wanted to sing. Elliott’s dream was to perform on Broadway. After high school, she landed a part in the touring company of “The Music Man,” and once auditioned for a part that went to Barbra Streisand. In fact, Michelle Phillips says Cass Elliott was always somewhat jealous of Streisand, for the kind of singing and acting career she’d created for herself. But, Phillips says, Cass Elliott gave us something that Streisand could not.

“Barbra Streisand may have great pipes, but she could never sing that song in that way,” Phillips says. “She doesn’t have the absolute sweetness and love in her voice that Cass had. Cass may not be able to hold a note as long as Barbra Streisand, but to me, it’s always been more important to capture the meaning of the lyrics and to capture the love in the song. And that’s what Cass could do.”

Cass Elliott, this 1960s hippie singer, a child of hard anti-war ballads, connected with this gentle Depression-era song like no other. For the six years she performed solo, “Dream a Little Dream of Me” became a mainstay in her concerts and television appearances. On July 27th, 1974, Cass Elliott sang it for the last time at a sold-out concert at London’s Paladium. Two days later, she died in her sleep. Cass Elliott was 32 years old.

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Jazz Music

Oscar Peterson – The Bach Suite: Allegro (with sheet music)

Oscar Peterson – The Bach Suite: Allegro (with sheet music)

Oscar Peterson sheet music pdf

Oscar Peterson

Oscar Peterson was one of the greatest piano players of all time. A pianist with phenomenal technique on the level of his idol, Art Tatum, Peterson‘s speed, dexterity, and ability to swing at any tempo were amazing. Very effective in small groups, jam sessions, and in accompanying singers, O.P. was at his absolute best when performing unaccompanied solos.

His original style did not fall into any specific idiom. Like Erroll Garner and George Shearing, Peterson‘s distinctive playing formed during the mid- to late ’40s and fell somewhere between swing and bop. Peterson was criticized through the years because he used so many notes, didn’t evolve much since the 1950s, and recorded a remarkable number of albums. Perhaps it is because critics ran out of favorable adjectives to use early in his career; certainly it can be said that Peterson played 100 notes when other pianists might have used ten, but all 100 usually fit, and there is nothing wrong with showing off technique when it serves the music.

As with Johnny Hodges and Thelonious Monk, to name two, Peterson spent his career growing within his style rather than making any major changes once his approach was set, certainly an acceptable way to handle one’s career. Because he was Norman Granz‘s favorite pianist (along with Tatum) and the producer tended to record some of his artists excessively, Peterson made an incredible number of albums. Not all are essential, and a few are routine, but the great majority are quite excellent, and there are dozens of classic Standards.

Without doubt, Oscar Peterson was one of the giants of jazz piano. His illustrious career spanned almost seven decades, and he played with some of the biggest names in jazz, including Ella Fitzgerald, Count Basie and Herbie Hancock. Duke Ellington called him the “Maharajah of the keyboard,” while Count Basie remarked, “Oscar Peterson plays the best ivory box I’ve ever heard.”

Born in a poor neighborhood of Montreal, Peterson became a piano virtuoso at an early age, and credits his sister Daisy Sweeney with expanding his musical horizon. Under his sister’s tutelage, Peterson mastered the core classical repertory, including the preludes and fugues by Johann Sebastian Bach. Bach’s continued influence inspired the composition of the Bach Suite, first released on the 1986 album “Oscar Peterson Live!”

In 1960, Peterson established the Advanced School of Contemporary Music in Toronto, which lasted for three years. He made his first recorded set of unaccompanied piano solos in 1968 (strange that Granz had not thought of it) during his highly rated series of MPS recordings. With the formation of the Pablo label by Granz in 1972, Peterson was often teamed with guitarist Joe Pass and bassist Niels Pedersen.

He appeared on dozens of all-star records, made five duet albums with top trumpeters (Dizzy Gillespie, Roy Eldridge, Harry “Sweets” Edison, Clark Terry, and Jon Faddis), and teamed up with Count Basie on several two-piano dates. An underrated composer, Peterson wrote and recorded the impressive “Canadiana Suite” in 1964 and has occasionally performed originals in the years since. Although always thought of as a masterful acoustic pianist, Peterson has also recorded on electric piano (particularly some of his own works), organ on rare occasions, and even clavichord for an odd duet date with Joe Pass.

One of his rare vocal sessions in 1965, With Respect to Nat, reveals that Peterson‘s singing voice was nearly identical to Nat King Cole‘s. A two-day reunion with Herb Ellis and Ray Brown in 1990 (which also included Bobby Durham) resulted in four CDs. Peterson was felled by a serious stroke in 1993 that knocked him out of action for two years. He gradually returned to the scene, however, although with a weakened left hand. Even when he wasn’t 100 percent, Peterson was a classic improviser, one of the finest musicians that jazz has ever produced.

The pianist appeared on an enormous number of records through the years. As a leader, he has recorded for Victor, Granz‘s Clef and Verve labels (1950-1964), MPS, Mercury, Limelight, Pablo, and Telarc.

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Jazz Music

Nat King Cole: Discovering the real man (behind the great musician).

Nat King Cole: Discovering the real man (behind the great musician).

The Nat King Cole story is a tale of two major talents, both owned by the same person. Equally skilled as a jazz pianist and a middle-of-the-road pop crooner, Cole would still be remembered with affection today if he only had one of those musical identities.

Nathaniel Adams Coles (he changed his last name to Cole early in his career) was born March 17, 1919 (although his birthdate has sometimes been given as 1917) in Montgomery, Alabama. He was one of four brothers who became musicians: bassist Eddie Coles (who was nine years older) and pianists Ike Cole and Freddy Cole, all of whom also sang. Raised in Chicago, Nat started on the organ when he was four and had his first piano lessons when he was 12. He considered his musical hero and main influence to be Earl Hines although, by the late 1930s, one could also hear bits of Teddy Wilson and Art Tatum in his playing.

Cole dropped out of school when he was 15 to work as a pianist, leading the Royal Dukes in 1934. When Eddie Coles returned to Chicago after touring with Noble Sissle, they formed a sextet, Eddie Coles’ Swingsters, recording four titles for the Decca label in 1936. The following year they toured with a revival of the musical Shuffle Along. That year he married a member of the cast, Nadine Robinson, and settled in Los Angeles after the show ended.

Cole led a short-lived big band and then formed a trio to play in clubs that also included guitarist Oscar Moore and bassist Wesley Prince. At first they called themselves the King Cole Swingsters before settling on the King Cole Trio.

All of the music that exists from Nat King Cole’s first period (1936-43) except for two sessions as a sideman with Lionel Hampton in 1940, has recently been released on the superb seven-CD (or ten-LP) Resonance box set Hittin’ The Band: The Early Years. The release starts off with the Eddie Coles date and then includes no less than 71 selections that were recorded by the trio for radio transcription services that predate the trio’s first official recordings in 1940.

Nat Knig Cole trio

These noncommercial renditions were made strictly for radio airplay and were not available for purchase. The music alternates hot swing instrumentals and ballads with vocalizing by the trio in worked out scat-filled unison passages on heated versions of standards and novelties.

On some numbers the trio accompanies other singers (Bonnie Lake, Juanelda Carter, Maxine Johnson, Anita Boyer, Pauline and her Perils, and the Dreamers) but up to that time Cole was not singing solos and the group’s ballads tended to be instrumentals. The legendary tale about how Nat King Cole first sang, being requested by an annoying drunk in a club, is a good story but obviously not true as evidenced by these performances.

The trio’s first official recordings were four titles made for the Ammor label on April 18, 1940 and these ironically have Lee Young added on drums; perhaps the label thought they were playing it safe. Of greater significance were a dozen titles made for Decca on December 6, 1940 and March 14 and July 16, 1941 for they include Nat King Cole having his first hit with a solo vocal on “Sweet Lorraine,” and doing a fine job on “This Will Make You Laugh” in addition to participating on some more group vocals and instrumentals.

By that time, the King Cole Trio, which had become quite popular in Los Angeles, was beginning to gain a national reputation, helped out by its radio broadcasts. Cole, who can finally be heard singing a ballad (“Nothing Ever Happens”) on a radio transcription from July 22, 1940, was starting to be noticed, both as an increasingly influential pianist and a likable singer. But it was the interplay of his piano with Oscar Moore’s guitar that really made the group catch on at that point.

Moore, who (inspired by Charlie Christian) had switched from acoustic to electric guitar, was at the top of his field, playing consistently swinging and inventive solos that, while often brief, added a great deal to the trio’s sound.

Wesley Prince did a fine job in a supportive role with the trio and, after he was drafted in 1942, his place was taken by the equally skilled Johnny Miller.

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One of the turning points of Cole’s career occurred when he signed with the Capitol label in the fall of 1943, an association that would continue throughout the remainder of his life. The best way to acquire Nat King Cole’s jazz recordings of 1943-61 is unfortunately a difficult and expensive task. The 18-CD box Mosaic box set The Complete Capitol Recordings Of The Nat King Cole Trio is perfectly done, including not only Cole’s studio sides but the many radio transcriptions that his group continued to make during the remainder of the 1940s along with later sessions from the 1950s that utilize the trio sound.

But unfortunately, this huge set was a limited-edition release and is long out-of-print. Unless one can snag a copy on eBay, fans have to be content with much smaller repackagings of some of the music

Cole’s first Capitol session included a hit in “Straighten Up And Fly Right” and it was soon followed by a remake of “Sweet Lorraine,” “It’s Only A Paper Moon,” and “Embraceable You.” Cole took a brief period off from the trio to participate in the first Norman Granz Jazz At The Philharmonic concert (having a humorous tradeoff with guitarist Les Paul on “Blues”) and occasionally appeared on all-star combo dates, but otherwise he continued as before except on a higher level. Between the recording sessions, radio transcriptions, radio shows, and club dates, the King Cole Trio kept very busy and evolved.

The “cool” Cole (40’s) Nat “King” Cole trio radio transcriptions

The group vocals largely ended after the mid-1940s with Cole now taking solo vocals on both swingers and ballads. While half of their sessions were instrumentals, the most popular records featured Cole’s friendly and warm singing including such hits as “Nature Boy,” “Route 66,” Mel Torme’s “The Christmas Song,” and Billy Strayhorn’s “Lush Life.” Each of those songs became standards thanks to Cole’s singing.

In 1947 guitarist Oscar Moore left the trio which was no longer a democracy but a unit dominated by its leader. His successor Irving Ashby played in a similar style as Moore. The following year, Joe Comfort took over for Johnny Miller on bass. But the biggest departure for the group was the addition of Jack Costanzo on bongos later in 1947, with the billing now being Nat King Cole and his Trio. The quartet was now occasionally hinting at bebop and, with Costanzo a regular member, they were open to utilizing Cuban rhythms.

In 1948 Cole divorced his first wife and married Marie Ellington (who had sung with the unrelated Duke Ellington). They would have five children (two of whom were adopted) including the future r&b singer Natalie Cole.

Everything changed in March 1950 when Nat King Cole recorded “Mona Lisa.” His recording became a Number One hit and suddenly Cole was a pop star. While he continued to tour with his trio for another year, after that it no longer had its own identity, becoming part of a larger orchestra that accompanied Cole’s singing.

While he usually played a song or two on piano during his shows, within a few years many of his newer fans did not know that Nat King Cole was a great pianist. It is a pity that there were not two separate Nat King Coles (with the pianist continuing his career). In the show biz world of the 1950s (and to an extent today), it was considered safer to be a specialist rather than a multi-talented performer so the piano was put on the backburner.

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After “Mona Lisa,” Nat King Cole had a continuous string of vocal hits during 1950-64 including “Unforgettable,” “Smile,” “(I Love You) For Sentimental Reasons,” “Too Young,” “Walkin’ My Baby Back Home,” “Send For Me,” “When I Fall In Love,” “Pretend,” “Answer Me, My Love,” and finally “L-O-V-E.” By the mid-1950s, his competitors were no longer Earl Hines and George Shearing but Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin.

During an era when African-American performers in the pop world could only go up so high, Cole helped to pierce the ceiling. The soft-spoken performer was attractive to women and non-threatening to men, he exuded class and, like Bing Crosby his singing always sounded effortless and natural. He became an international star.

The jazz world was not pleased, particularly with some of his sappier ballad albums with arranger Gordon Jenkins or such hits as “Ramblin’ Rose” and “The Hazy Lazy Crazy Days Of Summer,” but Cole gained in popularity every year. While his jazz sessions were secondary, he did not give up performing jazz entirely. Sessions with arrangers Billy May and Nelson Riddle sometimes featured him as a big band singer.

He recorded a few rare sets on piano including the After Midnight album which featured him in quartets (his trio with guitarist John Collins plus a guest horn soloist) although none of those swinging performances were instrumentals.

When he toured Europe in the early 1960s with the Quincy Jones big band, the European audiences gave him a cold reception until, with Jones’ urging, Cole sat down at the piano and played a few jazz standards. He showed during those concerts (some of which are available on CD) that he had not lost a thing in his piano playing.

Being African-American resulted in Cole being subject to racism despite his celebrity status. He had to fight to move to what had been a segregated area in Los Angeles. He was physically attacked (but not seriously hurt) at a concert in Birmingham, Alabama in 1956. And his groundbreaking television series of 1956-57 was cancelled after a year because it could not get a national sponsor for a black performer despite its impressive ratings. Many of those programs, which sometimes include jazz performances (including an episode with the Jazz At The Philharmonic All-Stars), have fortunately been released on DVD.

In his career, Nat King Cole appeared in many short musical films (such as Soundies and Snader Transcriptions) and even some regular films including Istanbul, China Gate, Night Of The Quarter Moon, and as W.C. Handy in the fictional St. Louis Blues. His last role was as a typically likable troubadour in Cat Ballou.

Despite the rise of rock and roll and the Beatles, Nat King Cole’s career was going fine until the fall of 1964 when he was diagnosed with lung cancer. A lifelong smoker, Cole’s health declined quickly and he passed away on February 15, 1965, when he was just 45.

In his career and beyond, Nat King Cole had more than 150 singles that made it to the Billboard charts (Pop, R&B and Country) and sold more than 50 million records. His daughter Natalie used film of her father to sing a very popular posthumous duet with him on “Unforgettable,” and his classic recording of “The Christmas Song” made the charts again during the holiday season of 2017. His influence as a singer and leader of trios can be heard in the performances of Diana Krall, John Pizzarelli, and many others.

It is fair to say that the unforgettable Nat King Cole, whose 100th birthday would have been in 2019, has little chance of being forgotten.

nat king cole sheet music
Nat King Cole sheet music
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Jazz Music

The Best of Billie Holiday (2/2)

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The Best of Billie Holiday (2) Jazz with Sheet Music

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Track list:

00:00 Me, Myself And I (1937) (Irving Gordon, Allan Roberts, Alvin S. Kaufman) 02:33 Nice Work If You Can Get It (1937) (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) 05:39 Summertime (1936) (George Gershwin, DuBose Heyward) 08:31 A Fine Romance (1936) (Jerome Kern, Dorothy Fields) 11:21 Moanin’ Low (1937) (Ralph Rainger, Howard Dietz) 14:22 God Bless The Child (1941) (Billie Holiday, Arthur Herzog, Jr.) 17:16 My Man (1938) (Jacques Charles, Channing Pollock, Albert Willemetz, Maurice Yvain) 20:15 Easy Living (1937) (Ralph Rainger, Leo Robin)

23:16 That’s Life I Guess (1936) (Peter DeRose, Sam M. Lewis) 26:23 Billie’s Blues aka I Love My Man (1936) (Billie Holiday) 29:00 These Foolish Things (Remind Me of You) (1936) (Eric Maschwitz, Jack Strachey) 32:16 Pennies From Heaven (1937) (Arthur Johnston, Johnny Burke) 35:20 I’ve Got My Love To Keep Me Warm (1937) (Irving Berlin) 38:24 They Can’t Take That Away From Me (1937) (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) 41:24 Don’t Explain (1944) (Billie Holiday, Arthur Herzog Jr.) 44:43 I’m A Fool To Want You (1958) (Frank Sinatra, Jack Wolf, and Joel Herron) 48:04 I’ll Be Around (1958) (Alec Wilder) 51:24 It’s Easy to Remember (1958) (Lorenz Hart, Richard Rodgers) 55:21 Glad to Be Unhappy (1958) (Lorenz Hart, Richard Rodgers) 59:26 For All We Know (1958) (J. Fred Coots, Sam M. Lewis)

Biography

Eleanora Fagan (April 7, 1915 – July 17, 1959), professionally known as Billie Holiday, was an American jazz and swing music singer with a career spanning 26 years. Nicknamed “Lady Day” by her friend and music partner Lester Young, Holiday had an innovative influence on jazz music and pop singing. Her vocal style, strongly inspired by jazz instrumentalists, pioneered a new way of manipulating phrasing and tempo. She was known for her vocal delivery and improvisational skills.

She was a successful concert performer throughout the 1950s with two further sold-out shows at Carnegie Hall. Because of personal struggles and an altered voice, her final recordings were met with mixed reaction but were mild commercial successes. Her final album, Lady in Satin, was released in 1958. Holiday died of cirrhosis on July 17, 1959. She won four Grammy Awards, all of them posthumously, for Best Historical Album. She was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1973. Lady Sings the Blues, a film about her life, starring Diana Ross, was released in 1972.

She is the primary character in the play (later made into a film) Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar and Grill; the role was originated by Reenie Upchurch in 1986 and was played by Audra McDonald on Broadway and in the film. In 2017 Holiday was inducted into the National Rhythm & Blues Hall of Fame.

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Bill Evans, The Solo Sessions I-II (1963)

Bill Evans, The Solo Sessions I-II (1963)with sheet music

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JACQUES LOUSSIER TRIO plays Mozart Piano Concerto no. 20

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JACQUES LOUSSIER TRIO plays Mozart Piano Concerto no. 20

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JACQUES LOUSSIER sheet music pdf

JACQUES LOUSSIER

Jacques Loussier, né à Angers le 26 octobre 1934 et mort à Blois le 5 mars 2019, est un pianiste et compositeur français particulièrement connu pour ses adaptations jazzy de l’œuvre de Jean-Sébastien Bach avec le Trio Play Bach.

Formation

À seize ans, il entre au conservatoire de Paris dans la classe du pianiste Yves Nat. C’est au conservatoire qu’il rencontre Jean-Pierre Eustache, flûtiste avec qui il se lie d’amitié. Un jour, ce dernier a besoin d’un pianiste de remplacement dans la brasserie de Caen où il joue tous les soirs. Il envoie un télégramme à Loussier : c’est le départ de la carrière de celui-ci comme « musicien de jazz »4.

Pour s’ouvrir à d’autres styles de musique, il passe ensuite deux ans à Cuba. En France, il accompagne des chanteurs tels que Catherine Sauvage, Léo Ferré, Charles Aznavour ou Frank Alamo5.

Le Trio Play Bach

En 1959, Jacques Loussier crée le Trio Play Bach avec Christian Garros à la batterie et Pierre Michelot à la contrebasse. Le principe : faire swinguer le répertoire de Jean-Sébastien Bach. Grâce à la qualité des arrangements de Loussier, le concept séduit les auditeurs et le succès est durable : 7 millions de disques vendus et plusieurs disques d’or en France et à l’étranger. Dans les années 1960-1970, il aura donné plus de 3 000 concerts dans plus de 80 pays et Glenn Gould déclarera trouver dans l’album Play Bach « une bonne façon de faire revivre le compositeur allemand ».

Carrière solo

Musicien éclectique et prolifique, Jacques Loussier compose plus d’une centaine de musiques de films (notamment pour les réalisateurs Yves Ciampi, Jean-Pierre Melville, Jean Delannoy, Michel Audiard ou encore Alain Jessua), de génériques de séries télévisées (comme les célèbres Thierry la Fronde et Vidocq), ou d’habillages d’antenne, comme celui de la nouvelle 3e chaîne. En 1982, l’agence de publicité RSCG utilise un morceau de son album Pulsion comme musique publicitaire pour le spot Des Hommes au service des Hommes d’EdF.

Le studio Miraval

En 1977, Jacques Loussier achète le château de Miraval, grande bastide de Provence située à Correns dans le Var (France) et entourée d’un domaine de 600 hectares comportant un domaine viticole de 30 hectares du vignoble de Provence. Il y fonde en compagnie de Patrice Quef, qui sera son ingénieur du son, le studio Miraval, studio d’enregistrement de classe internationale où Pink Floyd enregistre une grande partie de l’album The Wall, The Cure l’album Kiss Me, Kiss Me, Kiss Me, AC/DC l’album Blow Up Your Video. Viendront également d’autres artistes et d’autres groupes tels que Sade, Courtney Love, The Cranberries, Téléphone, UB40, Level 42, Indochine, Sting, Chris Rea, Judas Priest.

En 1980, il disperse le Trio Play Bach et se retire au château Miraval où il se consacre alors à la recherche musicale, composant notamment les Suites pour piano et synthétiseurs avec Luc Heller à la percussion, ainsi que les albums Pulsion, Pulsion Sous la mer et Pagan Moon.

En 1998, en pleine crise du disque, Jacques Loussier revend le château à l’homme d’affaires américain Tom Bove, qui le revend en 2011 aux acteurs Brad Pitt et Angelina Jolie.

Reformation du Trio Play Bach et nouvelles aventures

jacques loussier
Jacques Loussier en 2008.

En 1985, pour le tricentenaire de la naissance de Bach, Jacques Loussier est sollicité dans le monde entier et reforme le Trio Play Bach avec André Arpino aux percussions et Vincent Charbonnier à la contrebasse.

En 1987, il compose la messe Lumières, pour contre-ténor, soprano, chœur, percussions et orchestre dans le cadre du festival de Paray-le-Monial et avide d’expériences, compose dans la foulée un concerto pour trompette, un concerto pour violon et percussion et les Tableaux Vénitiens, une pièce pour cordes.

En 1989, il écrit pour Serge Golovine et Claude Bessy la musique du ballet des Trois couleurs créé au Grand Palais par l’École de l’Opéra de Paris à l’occasion du Bicentenaire de la Révolution.

Dans les années 1990, après le succès rencontré par son adaptation des Quatre Saisons de Vivaldi, il s’intéresse à la musique française du début du XXe siècle et s’attaque aux Gymnopédies d’Erik Satie, au Boléro de Maurice Ravel et en 2000, à l’œuvre de Debussy.

En 2001, il revient à Bach et enregistre avec son trio Les Variations Goldberg ainsi qu’un CD, Baroque Favorites, composé de grands thèmes de Domenico Scarlatti, Haendel, Albinoni, Alessandro Marcello et Marin Marais.

Il continue ensuite son exploration de l’œuvre des classiques en adaptant Beethoven, Chopin et Mozart.

En avril 2002, il assigne le rappeur Eminem qu’il accuse d’avoir plagié Pulsion avec son titre Kill You. Un accord à l’amiable met fin à ce litige en 2006.

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Jazz Music

70s Japanese Jazz Mix (Jazz-funk, Soul Jazz, Rare groove, Drum Breaks..)

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70s Japanese Jazz Mix (Jazz-funk, Soul Jazz, Rare groove, Drum Breaks..)

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70s Japanese Jazz Mix sheet music 楽譜